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Author Topic: Licensed in US and EU - any benefits?  (Read 168 times)

EvilLost

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Licensed in US and EU - any benefits?
« on: 07-10-18 at 10:16 am »

Is there any (real world) benefit to being licensed in both jurisdictions?

Would there be more benefit if I looked into in-house positions as opposed to firms?

I am currently a US patent attorney working at an international firm. In 1 more year, I will have completed the 3 years work experience necessary to sit for the EQE (EPO's patent bar). However, this test is notoriously difficult and would require substantial effort to pass.

The questions is:  Should I bother?



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Tobmapsatonmi

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Re: Licensed in US and EU - any benefits?
« Reply #1 on: 07-10-18 at 12:05 pm »

Is there any (real world) benefit to being licensed in both jurisdictions?

Would there be more benefit if I looked into in-house positions as opposed to firms?

I am currently a US patent attorney working at an international firm. In 1 more year, I will have completed the 3 years work experience necessary to sit for the EQE (EPO's patent bar). However, this test is notoriously difficult and would require substantial effort to pass.

The questions is:  Should I bother?


If I were in your shoes I'd certainly go for it, if for no other reason than a really nice feather in the cap and on the resume. As for benefit, I don't know about in-firm.  Would your current firm value this?

In-house at a corp that routinely files US and EPO, I would think there is considerable value in having someone who could do filing/prosecution before both Offices.  Even if the prosecution work was too much for one person, having that person do the initial filing then having the regular firm weigh in on or ghost the OA replies would save a lot of money.

Question, do you have to be resident in an EPO state to prosecute?  Or could you do it from the US?  I skimmed the list of US nationals who have passed the EQE and looking at the US-OED list it appears quite a few of them sit in-house at US HQ of their corp, but don't know if they're actually prosecuting at EPO from there or not.


Edit: Here's the listing; you can toggle nationality to US.  It's obviously not too common as there are only 46 people listed.

https://www.epo.org/learning-events/eqe/successful-candidates.html

« Last Edit: 07-10-18 at 12:08 pm by Tobmapsatonmi »
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EvilLost

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Re: Licensed in US and EU - any benefits?
« Reply #2 on: 07-13-18 at 07:06 am »

My current firm would value this, yes. Unfortunately, salaries here in EU are MUCH lower than in the US, so even with a paybump I can't imagine staying here long term.

Thanks for that link; I hadn't realized so few people have done this. Browsing through the list, it seems that even fewer are US attorneys (several are US patent agents).  This is quite encouraging!
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