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Author Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 2413954 times)

fewyearsin

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7185 on: 02-14-18 at 12:21 am »

So long as you donít lose your mind 🙄

mindlessly paper pushing with no human contact may not  be the best way to spend oneís best years 😏
That's why it's important to have an outside life.  Some jobs can be a big part of your life, others can leave more time outside of work for a life.  The PTO is one of those that leaves a lot of time outside work, but provides very limited fulfillment at work.
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This comment: does not represent the opinion or position of the PTO or any law firm; is not legal advice; and represents only a few quick thoughts from the author, not a well-researched treatise.  Seek out the advice of a competent patent attorney for answers to specific questions you may have.

abc123

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7186 on: 02-14-18 at 01:02 am »


The PTO is one of those that leaves a lot of time outside work

Maybe.

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steelie

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7187 on: 02-14-18 at 10:03 am »

I don't see many examiners making it 20+ years as an examiner.

I would say, it's extremely unlikely.

Being single, introverted, loner, "nothing better to do" then you can do it, or if you have no kids/adults kids, and not much family responsibilities.

Last biweek (pay period), I worked three 24 hour days straight.

There is enormous short-term pressure to get stuff done.
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snapshot

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7188 on: 02-14-18 at 10:19 am »

Last biweek (pay period), I worked three 24 hour days straight.

LOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOLOL.
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PatentExaminer18

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7189 on: 02-14-18 at 10:25 am »

I don't see many examiners making it 20+ years as an examiner.

I would say, it's extremely unlikely.

I thought examiners work as examiners for many years, as it hard to go back to work for the private sector after working a few years as an examiner. What career paths/ jobs are available/suitable for examiners who decide to leave the PTO ? 
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ThomasPaine

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7190 on: 02-14-18 at 10:36 am »

"Last biweek (pay period), I worked three 24 hour days straight."

You may want to consider the possibility that you're doing it all wrong.

Just saying.
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steelie

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7191 on: 02-14-18 at 10:57 am »

"Last biweek (pay period), I worked three 24 hour days straight."

You may want to consider the possibility that you're doing it all wrong.

Just saying.
In low allowance units (where you can go six months with no allowance), it's all searching, and writing.

You "live off your RCEs". However, in biweeks (pay periods) with no *easy* RCEs, then you're working like a dog to make production.

I would say about five times per year it can take me at least two days to find a reference.
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ThomasPaine

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7192 on: 02-14-18 at 11:09 am »

"I would say about five times per year it can take me at least two days to find a reference."

You may want to consider the possibility that you're doing it all wrong.

Just saying.
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two banks of four

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7193 on: 02-14-18 at 12:29 pm »

In other news, the administration trots out its ransom note again:

-no COLA raises for Feds, so effectively at least a 2% pay cut with inflation now at 2% and nudging up
-revamping retirement so FERS contribution kicks up to 6% eventually (which would be 5% more than it currently is)
-delay in-grade step increases
-remove COLA benefits for FERS

Last three items were previously proposed, but didn't pass.  This is perhaps the wet-dream scenario for those who want to stick it to Feds, but it's looking rather grim.  If they get this anywhere near passing, I'll begin to send out resumes...  Which probably means I should go polish my resume and cover letter...
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steelie

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7194 on: 02-14-18 at 12:37 pm »

In other news, the administration trots out its ransom note again:
Also, elimination of the FERS pension for anyone with less than 5 working years.

"Eliminate FERS contributions for Federal employees with fewer than five years of service. Instead, they would receive a lump sum benefit of contributions they have made to FERS and receive an additional 3 percentage points in automatic TSP contributions. This would make them eligible to receive up to 8 percent in total government contributions"
https://www.fedsmith.com/2018/02/09/changes-federal-employees-coming-workplace/
« Last Edit: 02-14-18 at 12:46 pm by steelie »
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ThomasPaine

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7195 on: 02-14-18 at 01:02 pm »

If you're a federal employee and you voted for the repubtards and president orange julius, you got nobody to blame but yourself. 
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fewyearsin

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7196 on: 02-14-18 at 01:03 pm »

In other news, the administration trots out its ransom note again:
Also, elimination of the FERS pension for anyone with less than 5 working years.

"Eliminate FERS contributions for Federal employees with fewer than five years of service. Instead, they would receive a lump sum benefit of contributions they have made to FERS and receive an additional 3 percentage points in automatic TSP contributions. This would make them eligible to receive up to 8 percent in total government contributions"
https://www.fedsmith.com/2018/02/09/changes-federal-employees-coming-workplace/
Which is an absolute ripoff for the Feds.  Take away a benefit worth about 10% of their salary, and give them an extra 3%, and tell them that it is all roughly equal.

But again we all know that it's a ruse to get rid of any competent government workers, so then they can say "hey, our government workers suck, let's hire all this work out to our contractor friends!"  So the end game is reduced services at astronomically higher prices.  Yay for average Joe taxpayer!
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This comment: does not represent the opinion or position of the PTO or any law firm; is not legal advice; and represents only a few quick thoughts from the author, not a well-researched treatise.  Seek out the advice of a competent patent attorney for answers to specific questions you may have.

fewyearsin

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7197 on: 02-14-18 at 01:09 pm »

"I would say about five times per year it can take me at least two days to find a reference."

You may want to consider the possibility that you're doing it all wrong.

Just saying.
First, the kinds of people that struggle at the PTO are likely the kind of people that would struggle anywhere.  Certain time-management and prioritization skills apply cross-discipline.  ALL professionals face regular deadline pressure.  Attorneys, for example, have NON-EXTENDABLE deadlines, unlike examiners who can just take a hit on their DM score, but otherwise are fine to blow deadlines.  Attorneys either have to pay extension fees out of their own pocket, or have to face possible malpractice claims (hint - career ending) for blowing a final deadline.  And what about Doctors?  Oh, I don't feel like operating today, why don't you come in tomorrow AFTER YOU DIE.  Yeah, lots of people have deadline pressure, that's called being a professional.  Comes with the territory.

Second, it is a bad idea to rely on RCEs to meet counts.  The way I was taught, and has served me well, is to always do work as though you have no RCEs coming in, and then when they do come in, they are just gravy, and if you've worked extra hours (which it sounds like you do), then you can claim OT and still meet production.  Win-win!  More money, and less volatility and stress.
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This comment: does not represent the opinion or position of the PTO or any law firm; is not legal advice; and represents only a few quick thoughts from the author, not a well-researched treatise.  Seek out the advice of a competent patent attorney for answers to specific questions you may have.

lazyexaminer

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7198 on: 02-14-18 at 01:14 pm »

Steelie has already said he works VOT and uses leave just to hit 95% production. He is clearly not the norm, and most people with such difficulty would have left long ago. I just hope new folks reading this board donít take his words as gospel.
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I'm not your examiner, I'm not your lawyer, and I'm speaking only for myself, not for the USPTO.

abc123

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7199 on: 02-14-18 at 01:24 pm »

I thought examiners work as examiners for many years, as it hard to go back to work for the private sector after working a few years as an examiner. What career paths/ jobs are available/suitable for examiners who decide to leave the PTO ?

I know a guy who is a former examiner who is tending a bar in Boston.

What is kind of scary is when an examiner can't hack it, and he has to come back as a contractor, doing things like teaching examiners how to use some new search engine. Kind of like the movie industry, where when the actors get too old, they become extras.

On another note, fewyearsin has got it right. Also, he once mentioned how he likes to suggest words in the claims to make them allowable. If you look at the examiners who have survived and possibly thrived for a long time, that is how they do it. The game of stringing out RCE's like fish on a fishline eventually catches up with the examiner. It is easy to spot on a production sheet, and eventually the examiner will find himself, well, tending a bar.
« Last Edit: 02-14-18 at 01:27 pm by abc123 »
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