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Author Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 2273038 times)

steelie

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6990 on: 11-22-17 at 01:57 pm »

A little bit off topic, does anyone know how they use key-stroke logging

In the IG report, they stated that unlike the old routers, the new CISCO routers maintain continuous connections (not dropping/reconnecting, rather updating within short intervals), so I was under the impression that they use the router connected/disconnected history.
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Feta Cheese

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6991 on: 11-22-17 at 03:00 pm »

From what I heard, putting a key-log requires director approval or something and isn't something they do as a general rule except to catch people suspected of abusing t&a
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steelie

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6992 on: 11-22-17 at 03:19 pm »

A little bit off topic, does anyone know how they use key-stroke logging

In the IG report, they stated that unlike the old routers, the new CISCO routers maintain continuous connections (not dropping/reconnecting, rather updating within short intervals), so I was under the impression that they use the router connected/disconnected history.

They did say in the RSP Q/A .. that if your cable goes down (so you're disconnected), and you stay logged into your latop .. then later on .. when you reconnect ... it will credit you for the time you were logged into your laptop.

So, at least, they must be looking at the workstation login/logout records.
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Rabid Levity

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6993 on: 11-22-17 at 03:25 pm »


It could have been a coincidence, but I wonder that perhaps the phrase I typed is considered to be politically sensitive by the surveillance software, and that the typing triggered a recording of some sort of monitoring system.

as another poster mentioned,  with the amount of info they have on you allows them to do some unseemly stuff
 


To ensure safety, you need to envelope the distal portion of the monitor in aluminium foil.

Same thing with your Samsung or Sony "smart" television, which otherwise will beam a constant image of you to the federal government.

They are out there; and They are always watching.

 ;)
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kokushibyou

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6994 on: 11-30-17 at 10:42 pm »

If anyone is struggling at GS-7 or 9 or even 11....get out before its too late and you have no useful engineering skills left.
This.  Being an Examiner at the USPTO is a very unique career path.  It has no branches.  You become an examiner, and can get promoted to do more examination in less time, until you are a Primary. Then you dead end.  Further career options are pretty limited.  Maybe become a SPE.  Maybe get a law degree and try for PTAB, Petitions, Office of Solicitor, or some of the other JD-required jobs at the PTO.  But I can't really think of any outside, non-PTO job that being an examiner prepares you for.  In most cases, if/when you leave, you are starting over.  So if you are not ready to commit fewer than 2, or more than 10 years to the PTO, best get to gettin'.

Hi all, I am one of the new Examiners still on probationary period from the hiring of 1/17/2017. As I'm approaching the one year mark the more concerned I grow about my future as while I am meeting my production as a GS-7 I feel like I am working way too hard at it and I've seen some similar opinions as the one this post is quoting. Still being new, is this a big problem or will it eventually click for me as some of my other colleges have suggested happens? What was the catalyst that helped the job "click" for you? If the overwhelming advice is still to get out, what are my options? With limited engineering experience before coming to the office and now with my time at the office how do I even market myself?

Any help/advice is appreciated.
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abc123

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6995 on: 12-01-17 at 12:10 am »

If you have a good supervisor, you can probably work it out if you are reasonably competent. If you have a bad supervisor, maybe not letting you allow any cases, then it is possibly hopeless. Just remember that if you decide you want to leave, you should start looking early while you have a job, since not having one will make it a lot harder. Also, remember the economy is good right now, so if you do end up leaving, you can hopefully find the job that you want.

One more thing. Some people take examining too serious, writing long office actions that are kind of pointless. I once knew someone who would proof read every page of the specification. Believe it or not, the PTO outsources this function to people in prisons who proof read the case after it is allowed. The search is the key. If your SPE wants office actions as thick as the Gutenberg bible, you probably won't be examining very long. Anyway, good luck.
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bluerogue

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6996 on: 12-01-17 at 03:18 pm »

I don't know if it's a big problem or not.  I knew a couple of guys who had issues at 1 year, was stressing, etc., but ended up just fine.  They still struggle a bit, but are managing a decent career.  I know of many primaries who also are struggling.  It depends probably.  It did seem that for those who were struggling at 1 year had something click by year two.  Honestly, if it doesn't click by year two, I don't think it'll get any better.  Examining is a bit of a rote job.  Also, you'll be getting better at searching and writing OAs so that should come easier. 

Like abc said, if you have a good SPE, it can probably work out.  I'd echo his advice about the work you're putting in as well.  Do what you need to.  We're not given enough time to do a great job.  We're given time to do a reasonable job. 
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The views expressed are my own and do not represent those of the USPTO. I am also not your lawyer nor providing legal advice.

fewyearsin

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6997 on: 12-04-17 at 02:44 pm »

I'd echo his advice about the work you're putting in as well.  Do what you need to.  We're not given enough time to do a great job.  We're given time to do a reasonable job.
This.  It can be hard for some people to not do a perfect job every action.  Some people are idealists or perfectionists.  But the reality is that if you only get 12 hours credit for doing a first action, you can't consistently take 20 hours.  And really you should be getting some cases done in 8 hours to balance out those few that do need to take 20 hours.
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ex-aminer?

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6998 on: 12-04-17 at 07:38 pm »

Being a perfectionist is probably the worst trait an examiner can have.  I use the "inverted pyramid" when searching: first I pull up a similar case or two and import the art.  Then Ill text search the best sub-classes.  If you understand your art well, you will find the best art early on this way.  This prob has 90% of citable art.  If I have a solid 102 or 103 on the entire invention in this narrow field, im done searching. If I don't have solid art ill expand to browsing the entire best few subclasses.  After this, you looked at 99%.  Examiners who fruitlessly search even broader and less relevant stuff to cover that 1% of misclassified art are wasting their time.  Searching under every obscure rock is the perfectionism that will sink you.

The next killer is I actually had some old-timers in my academy who would type one finger at. time.  Learning to type quickly is a skill worth investing some time in.

If your art is good, and it should be if its cited, you dont need to explain every detail.  Patent Attys are smart and have had even more time understanding the art than the examiners.  Point out everything, but good art is pretty self-evident.  If you're writing a novel, you are probably weaving bs.

I completely agree with what someone said above, you get the job or you don't.  The people who got promoted right away amd hit the ground running are almost inevitably the ones who get Primary quickly and are lacking stress and time-crunch.
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abc123

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6999 on: 12-04-17 at 08:58 pm »

There was a time in the distant past when examiners would only cite the combination of references on a note card, which would get mailed to the applicant. I don't know why they eliminated it, but I think it is a good idea, and is pretty close to what many if not most expert examiners do, if they still exist. I think this, and a required reasons for allowance, would be a great combination.

Don't underestimate the value of getting a search from one of the experienced examiners. It may seem like a waste of time, but it used to help me a lot, because they would often not only give me classes to search, but other useful information as well, like how to deal with the case. Also, it is a good way to get to know people in the office, especially outside your art unit, and will give you a better view of what is going on in the office, and maybe where there are potential positions to transfer to if you want. With work at home, this is unfortunately less of a viable option.
« Last Edit: 12-04-17 at 09:22 pm by abc123 »
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steelie

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7000 on: 12-05-17 at 07:37 am »

Hi all, I am one of the new Examiners still on probationary period from the hiring of 1/17/2017. As I'm approaching the one year mark the more concerned I grow about my future as while I am meeting my production as a GS-7 I feel like I am working way too hard at it and I've seen some similar opinions as the one this post is quoting. Still being new, is this a big problem or will it eventually click for me as some of my other colleges have suggested happens? What was the catalyst that helped the job "click" for you? If the overwhelming advice is still to get out, what are my options? With limited engineering experience before coming to the office and now with my time at the office how do I even market myself?
Any help/advice is appreciated.

It took me about eight years before the job really "clicked".

That's probably 500 Office actions, so maybe after 500 times doing it .... it finally sunk into my thick skull.  :D

About "getting out" ...I think if you're willing to keep working hard at it ... they will keep you ... however, the question to ask yourself is ... can you really make it 30-40 years grinding out mindless work on a computer screen?
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fewyearsin

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7001 on: 12-05-17 at 11:46 am »

the question to ask yourself is ... can you really make it 30-40 years grinding out mindless work on a computer screen?
This is big.  I've noticed my circle of friends shrinking while my few remaining social contacts have their circle of friends and professional networks expanding at other jobs.  Basically I feel like this job (examining) is slowly sucking the life from me.  It is truly fantastic the flexibility and predictability and work from home.  But that's where the "pro" column ends, and the "con" column seems to be ever-growing.
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abc123

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7002 on: 12-05-17 at 12:48 pm »


About "getting out" ...I think if you're willing to keep working hard at it ... they will keep you ...

Or, just become one of the "they's"

If you have a law degree, your options are much greater.

Otherwise, aside from the benchers and the people who support the claims adjusters (ie, secretaries and IT personnel) there really is not much.
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openpatent

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7003 on: 12-07-17 at 07:00 pm »


About "getting out" ...I think if you're willing to keep working hard at it ... they will keep you ...

Or, just become one of the "they's"

If you have a law degree, your options are much greater.

Otherwise, aside from the benchers and the people who support the claims adjusters (ie, secretaries and IT personnel) there really is not much.

Um, 80% of the SPEs in my division don't have JDs.
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Tobmapsatonmi

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #7004 on: 12-07-17 at 07:15 pm »


Um, 80% of the SPEs in my division don't have JDs.


Yes, I believe "those" are the "theys" to which ABC123 refers.   :D
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