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Author Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 2274263 times)

Tobmapsatonmi

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6930 on: 10-06-17 at 02:25 pm »

So if the newhire examiner is not an inventor/owner of the patent apps, but just the drafting/filing attorney, once the applications shift to another attorney at their old firm there's no longer any conflict?

What if the newhire examiner gets assigned to the same GAU where those apps are being examined? 
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bluerogue

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6931 on: 10-06-17 at 03:33 pm »

So if the newhire examiner is not an inventor/owner of the patent apps, but just the drafting/filing attorney, once the applications shift to another attorney at their old firm there's no longer any conflict?

What if the newhire examiner gets assigned to the same GAU where those apps are being examined? 

This happened to me.  I'm conflicted out on any patent I touched before joining the PTO.  This includes patents that I did not write, but reviewed, approved, etc.  I've had to move away a few applications because of this, but it's not as many as you might imagine.  You're conflicted out of those apps pretty much forever (and for good reason, IMO). 
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The views expressed are my own and do not represent those of the USPTO. I am also not your lawyer nor providing legal advice.

Tobmapsatonmi

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6932 on: 10-07-17 at 02:17 pm »

So if the newhire examiner is not an inventor/owner of the patent apps, but just the drafting/filing attorney, once the applications shift to another attorney at their old firm there's no longer any conflict?

What if the newhire examiner gets assigned to the same GAU where those apps are being examined? 

This happened to me.  I'm conflicted out on any patent I touched before joining the PTO.  This includes patents that I did not write, but reviewed, approved, etc.  I've had to move away a few applications because of this, but it's not as many as you might imagine.  You're conflicted out of those apps pretty much forever (and for good reason, IMO).


Thanks, good info.
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midnightsun

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6933 on: 10-08-17 at 10:06 pm »

Thank you! Really helpful!
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johnthatcher

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6934 on: 10-19-17 at 11:52 pm »

Do they require school transcript for the Patent examiner position regardless of how much experience you have in the corporate place ?
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fewyearsin

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6935 on: 10-20-17 at 02:40 am »

Do they require school transcript for the Patent examiner position regardless of how much experience you have in the corporate place ?
Yes.

This is the government.  There are all sorts of forms and hoops and order and steps that they follow.  Get used to it if you want to work for the USPTO.  There's this thing called bureaucracy, and it permeates everything you will do.
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johnthatcher

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6936 on: 11-01-17 at 06:28 pm »

Does your GPA have to be above 3.0 in order to be considered for a Patent examiner position regardless of how much experience you have in the corporate world in EE ?
« Last Edit: 11-02-17 at 12:01 am by johnthatcher »
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Feta Cheese

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6937 on: 11-03-17 at 11:26 am »

Does your GPA have to be above 3.0 in order to be considered for a Patent examiner position regardless of how much experience you have in the corporate world in EE ?

They've hired sub 3.0's before as GS-5's. I don't know what their protocol is now.
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abc123

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6938 on: 11-03-17 at 05:46 pm »

Given the nature of the job, I would think they would reward you for having a sub 3.0 GPA.

The only thing I remember about patent examining is keying into a search engine about nine different variations of the term bandwidth, and then crossing the results with five different variations of the word channel, and then flipping a coin to decide whether to allow the case.

I don't see how having a 3.0001 instead of a 2.9999 GPA should entitle someone to a higher pay grade. Like I said, it I think it should probably work the other way. If nothing else, the sub 3.0 applicant is more likely to be retained as they will probably get bored less easily.
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snapshot

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6939 on: 11-03-17 at 05:53 pm »

Does your GPA have to be above 3.0 in order to be considered for a Patent examiner position regardless of how much experience you have in the corporate world in EE ?

They've hired sub 3.0's before as GS-5's. I don't know what their protocol is now.

I don't think they hire examiners at GS-5 anymore.  All current openings are GS-7/9s.

It looks like you don't have to have a 3.0 GPA if one of the other academic achievement requirements are met. But I guess those would be tough without a superior GPA.
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snapshot

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6940 on: 11-03-17 at 05:55 pm »

Given the nature of the job, I would think they would reward you for having a sub 3.0 GPA.

The only thing I remember about patent examining is keying into a search engine about nine different variations of the term bandwidth, and then crossing the results with five different variations of the word channel, and then flipping a coin to decide whether to allow the case.

I don't see how having a 3.0001 instead of a 2.9999 GPA should entitle someone to a higher pay grade. Like I said, it I think it should probably work the other way. If nothing else, the sub 3.0 applicant is more likely to be retained as they will probably get bored less easily.

Terrible post is terrible.  It's a good thing you no longer work at the PTO, and I would imagine a terrible thing for your current employer.
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abc123

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6941 on: 11-03-17 at 06:51 pm »

  It's a good thing you no longer work at the PTO

Well, you got that part right.

« Last Edit: 11-03-17 at 07:53 pm by abc123 »
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steelie

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6942 on: 11-05-17 at 03:27 am »

Frustrating.

1. Searching is frustrating.
2. SPE says "art isn't good enough, so keep searching" is frustrating.
3. After two days of write up, SPE says "similar art XXXXX is better, so rewrite" is very frustrating.
4. Trying to get something allowed is frustrating. (SPE will say "Talk to other person, search on new terms, look at art in different class").
5. Attorney debate and condescension can be frustrating. ("When are you going to allow this?", "Do you even understand the invention?", "How does this make sense?")
6. Can't tell attorney what's really happening.  SPE will say "this is one we're not going to allow", so you have to keep adding references.
7. Not enough time to do high quality work, yet they expect it.
8. Board decisions "art not good enough", so sometimes have to redo work.
9. Some SPEs want "claim-to-claim double patenting mappings" causing you many hours of extra work on d.p. rejections.

Often, you feel like banging your head against the wall.
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abc123

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6943 on: 11-05-17 at 05:04 pm »

Most of these issues go away when you become a Primary. Trouble is, long before that, your chances of ever obtaining an engineering job are gone. Just see the postings on Glass Door if you don't believe me. And after 3 years, most law firms won't pick you up either, as almost everyone in this forum seems to agree.
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johnthatcher

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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #6944 on: 11-05-17 at 06:03 pm »

How do they decide which art unit the person is assigned to ?  Do they look at the transcript and assign you based on the classes you took or do they actually focus more on what have you done working in the corporate world ?

Thanks.
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