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 51 
 on: 03-25-17 at 06:33 pm 
Started by dcb942 - Last post by blakesq
I think that would be very valuable in improving your marketability as a new patent attorney.


[/quote]

So If I were to get my masters in computer science or EE with a decent GPA would that change things at all?
[/quote]

 52 
 on: 03-25-17 at 06:20 pm 
Started by tuka - Last post by smgsmc
Hi dears,
My patent attorney is registered in US,
 after I gave him a copy of the provisional and the electronic Receipt,
he requested a copy of the Official Filing Receipt which I receive it by mail, is there any risk?
what should I do to protect my invention?

Not sure what your question is.  Are you worried that if you send your patent attorney a copy of the official filing receipt, he could steal your invention?

 53 
 on: 03-25-17 at 06:10 pm 
Started by dcb942 - Last post by smgsmc
Here's another complication.  It's not clear that a BS in Aerospace Engineering will qualify you to sit for the patent bar.  The requirements and application process are given in the OED GRB:


Under Cat A, "Aeronautical Engineering" is listed, but "Aerospace Engineering" is not.  Call OED for an initial discussion of whether your degree qualifies.  However, nothing they tell you over the phone is binding, and you won't find out for sure until you submit an application.  If you don't qualify under Cat A, you'll need to go Cat B or Cat C routes, as explained in the GRB.

We've had a couple of other Aerospace Engineers inquire here about prospects as a patent attorney/agent; maybe they will chime in with their experiences (don't know whether any went ahead).

They are the same degree.

Perhaps to you they are, but what matters is whether they are the same to the OED.  If you look at the GRB, an example given is that "Biology" qualifies under Cat A, but "Biological Sciences" does not.  You are dealing with an extremely nit-picky bureaucracy.  It may turn out to be nothing (and I hope that's the case), but at least I've given you early warning; whether you heed it or not is up to you.

 54 
 on: 03-25-17 at 05:55 pm 
Started by dcb942 - Last post by dcb942
Your undergraduate degree is not in demand which will make obtaining a position much more difficult.  Potential employers will not look at the classes that you took to determine if you're a good candidate, only the listed name of your degree on your diploma and your GPA will count.  This is primarily due to client requirements.

Obtaining a second degree in CS might make you more marketable, but make sure it is from an accredited program.  Certifications are not valued in any way.  Teaching yourself more engineering/CS will not help you get a job.  (though, it could be helpful once you have a job)

The statistics provided by the UH law center are deceiving.  A very substantial portion of the students going through the program are in the part time program and have a job lined up before even starting the program (oil companies are still reimbursing their employees for going to law school).  This results in substantially inflated employments statistics.  Those that enter the program without having a job lined up have a much more difficult time finding employment upon graduation than the employment statistics would suggest.

Going to law school is a huge gamble.  Employment outcome is dictated nearly exclusively by your class rank and rank of the school.  All classes are graded on a curve so there will be some fraction of those taking each class that receives poor grades even if everyone in the class has a near perfect understanding of all of the material.

If you go to law school, your undergraduate GPA will not be a factor.  Only your class rank from law school.

Your GPA will significantly hurt your chances of becoming a patent agent.  It's not uncommon for firms to require a minimum of 3.5 GPA for agent positions.

I think your best shot would be to try to work on developing connections around Houston.  Connections will allow you to obtain a position even with less desirable degree/job.  Chat up the legal department where you work and figure out which firms are used as outside counsel for patent prosecution.  Then get a feel for these firms and try to meet the attorneys that are doing the work.  They might not have a position for you but they might know another firm that is looking.  The patent prosecution community in Houston is pretty small.

So If I were to get my masters in computer science or EE with a decent GPA would that change things at all?

 55 
 on: 03-25-17 at 05:38 pm 
Started by dcb942 - Last post by dcb942
Here's another complication.  It's not clear that a BS in Aerospace Engineering will qualify you to sit for the patent bar.  The requirements and application process are given in the OED GRB:


Under Cat A, "Aeronautical Engineering" is listed, but "Aerospace Engineering" is not.  Call OED for an initial discussion of whether your degree qualifies.  However, nothing they tell you over the phone is binding, and you won't find out for sure until you submit an application.  If you don't qualify under Cat A, you'll need to go Cat B or Cat C routes, as explained in the GRB.

We've had a couple of other Aerospace Engineers inquire here about prospects as a patent attorney/agent; maybe they will chime in with their experiences (don't know whether any went ahead).

They are the same degree.

 56 
 on: 03-25-17 at 05:15 pm 
Started by shivaprem - Last post by inventurous
I think you first need to understand that "object" and "advantages" have different meanings, so they wouldn't be considered interchangeable. Then you also consider that the term "invention" shouldn't be used very often.

While usage varies, I prefer to only  mention that the invention will be described in terms of various embodiments, and then when describing all of the variations, will refer to each as an "embodiment" thus, I will typically describe advantages of an embodiment, not of the invention as a whole.

Objects are objectives (e.g., outcomes/effects), whereas advantages are benefits. They are not the same.

Generally, I would never use the phrase "the object of the current invention" regardless of whether I even bother to describe any advantages or not.

tldr: replace "the object of" with "an advantage of" and "the current invention" with "this embodiment"

 57 
 on: 03-25-17 at 04:45 pm 
Started by tuka - Last post by Weng Tianxiang
You can make minor amendment on anything from spec, drawing and claim, but it will be accepted for typo errors, barring any new materials added into them.

Weng

 58 
 on: 03-25-17 at 04:03 pm 
Started by dcb942 - Last post by smgsmc
Here's another complication.  It's not clear that a BS in Aerospace Engineering will qualify you to sit for the patent bar.  The requirements and application process are given in the OED GRB:

https://www.uspto.gov/sites/default/files/OED_GRB.pdf

Under Cat A, "Aeronautical Engineering" is listed, but "Aerospace Engineering" is not.  Call OED for an initial discussion of whether your degree qualifies.  However, nothing they tell you over the phone is binding, and you won't find out for sure until you submit an application.  If you don't qualify under Cat A, you'll need to go Cat B or Cat C routes, as explained in the GRB.

We've had a couple of other Aerospace Engineers inquire here about prospects as a patent attorney/agent; maybe they will chime in with their experiences (don't know whether any went ahead).

 59 
 on: 03-25-17 at 01:34 pm 
Started by shivaprem - Last post by shivaprem
Hi!

I have heard that some drawings and specification in patents are copyrighted.

So how do I use them in description of a prior art?

Thank you in advance!

 60 
 on: 03-25-17 at 01:28 pm 
Started by shivaprem - Last post by shivaprem
Thank you for all your replies.

I have read info presented with the links,

but I still don't have an answer to my question.

How do I avoid the phrase " the object of current invention is.. " and instead using a  phrase having the word "...advantages..."

I have used google patent search in order to find patent having
Quote
For example "advantages of such an embodiment include..."

I get one patent and my question is still not answered.

All ideas are appreciated.

Thank you in advance!

Pavel.

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