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 1 
 on: Today at 01:21 am 
Started by JTripodo - Last post by openpatent
Unless you have stellar creds and leave the pto early, your exit options are pretty grim. I can imagine many an examiner becoming a technician, store customer service rep (actually met one) or some side gig, like an Uber driver.

 2 
 on: Today at 12:52 am 
Started by Lighamus - Last post by smgsmc
There are sometimes opportunities overseas (Japan, Taiwan, evil China, South Korea) if you don't mind the working environment which can be awful at some such firms. 
Are these firms hiring newbies though?  I've seen ads from overseas firms for experienced US patent agents or attorneys to handle US patent prosecution.

 3 
 on: Today at 12:25 am 
Started by JTripodo - Last post by steelie
The USPTO dashboard TC-level statistics includes an "examiner tenure" metric. The current average tenure for utility examiners is just under 10.5 years.
The recent PTO performance reports show like 400-500 examiners leave every year.

However, that was during the "great recession" era of the last 10 years.

Now with this booming economy, super low unemployment, I would think that number would rise.

But would you exchange what you have for hours commuting or having to move? Or worrying about cyclical layoffs? Or how your coworkers rate you every quarter(see Tesla)? My hunch is that most examiners, esp gs 12+, won’t.
A few pages back, I wrote how great it is to be a hoteling examiner at the PTO.

However ....

My issues:
1. The push for super-high quality is costing me a lot of time.
2. The "Alice" / "implicit 112f" analysis/interpretation/response to application is costing me a lot of time.
3. "Alice" forces me to do the job of a lawyer, I have to respond to case law arguments.
4. The examining process doesn't feel constructive. The nature of my "crowded art" means it's practically impossible for me to suggest allowable subject matter, so I'm mostly working against the applicant -- even when I lead them down the primrose path of AFCP & RCEs -- keep trying -- maybe next time.
5. I get no bonuses, do no OT, burn my vacation and I still feel "burned out".
6. Often I think about how great it will be when I am old, and "have my years in" <---- that's not healthy
7. I feel like I get insufficient time to do the job.

 4 
 on: Yesterday at 11:32 pm 
Started by JTripodo - Last post by openpatent
The USPTO dashboard TC-level statistics includes an "examiner tenure" metric. The current average tenure for utility examiners is just under 10.5 years.
The recent PTO performance reports show like 400-500 examiners leave every year.

However, that was during the "great recession" era of the last 10 years.

Now with this booming economy, super low unemployment, I would think that number would rise.

But would you exchange what you have for hours commuting or having to move? Or worrying about cyclical layoffs? Or how your coworkers rate you every quarter(see Tesla)? My hunch is that most examiners, esp gs 12+, won’t.

 5 
 on: Yesterday at 11:04 pm 
Started by JTripodo - Last post by steelie
The USPTO dashboard TC-level statistics includes an "examiner tenure" metric. The current average tenure for utility examiners is just under 10.5 years.
The recent PTO performance reports show like 400-500 examiners leave every year.

However, that was during the "great recession" era of the last 10 years.

Now with this booming economy, super low unemployment, I would think that number would rise.

 6 
 on: Yesterday at 11:02 pm 
Started by mersenne - Last post by two banks of four
Even better, the '734 was a first action allowance with no reasons for allowance  ::) That's my pet peeve.

My first assumption was the same as bluerogue, but these seem weird in that they are not clearly related to any other cases.

The examiner of '734 seems to have a number of other recent issued patents, not Walmart, with 18 month pendency or less. Maybe that art unit or that examiner's docket is just like that...

The examination all around on that '734 patent is terrible.  Did you see how not detailed the search was?  Plus the lack of reasons for allowance in a first action issue is completely counter to USPTO policy.

It's amazing what some of the people get away with.  A search record with just four entries, and no discussion re: what's considered to be the most pertinent reference.  This is worse than half-assing something, and it appears that there was zero eff given.  I mean, even if someone were exceedingly familiar with a technology and knows the boundary between what's patentable and what isn't, one can't assume that everyone else recognizes this boundary.  Makes one wonder who this person obtained signatory authority in the very first place.  If I were the applicant, i'd be concerned about the quality of the patent received...

 7 
 on: Yesterday at 08:26 pm 
Started by Lighamus - Last post by snapshot
From what I've heard, EE and CS are the degrees that firms are pursuing, along with some biotech (usually
There are sometimes opportunities overseas (Japan, Taiwan, evil China, South Korea) if you don't mind the working environment which can be awful at some such firms.  Varies from "just get your work done" to "twelve hour days and then go out drinking with your coworkers until you barf, punishment for being ten seconds late on clock-in, and insane workload".  A guy I knew at one firm quit because he was expected to work a full normal day shift and then deal with USPTO phone interviews "on his own time" from roughly 10pm to 7am.

That sounds literally insane.

 8 
 on: Yesterday at 07:50 pm 
Started by Lighamus - Last post by smgsmc
I have been curious about trying to get a job as a patent agent of late.  I've no real experience in the field and am a recent graduate with a Bachelors in physics and Minor in Chemistry.  If I were to take a pass the exam, what is the job prognosis of someone with my qualifications?  From what I've read it seems that having a Physics BS is enough but I do not quite understand how you get your first year of experience really.
Here is my previous response on this topic:

http://www.intelproplaw.com/ip_forum/index.php/topic,29753.msg137376.html#msg137376

 9 
 on: Yesterday at 07:27 pm 
Started by mersenne - Last post by snapshot
'157 and '734 are original apps, each claiming priority to provisional filed a year before.  I'm especially surprised that '734 got examined and allowed at 3 months -- it seems like the PTO would barely have time to read the application, figure out the art unit, and send it over.  (Art unit was 2655 Dynamic Information Storage or Retrieval).

I wish I could get my applications to rock-n-roll like that!

Cherry picking "easy" applications is very much a thing at the PTO, especially when it's the end of a quarter or fiscal year and examiners are desperate for counts to avoid warnings.  We're supposed to do first in/first out (it's in the MPEP), but there is no real enforcement of that.

 10 
 on: Yesterday at 07:23 pm 
Started by mersenne - Last post by snapshot
Even better, the '734 was a first action allowance with no reasons for allowance  ::) That's my pet peeve.

My first assumption was the same as bluerogue, but these seem weird in that they are not clearly related to any other cases.

The examiner of '734 seems to have a number of other recent issued patents, not Walmart, with 18 month pendency or less. Maybe that art unit or that examiner's docket is just like that...

The examination all around on that '734 patent is terrible.  Did you see how not detailed the search was?  Plus the lack of reasons for allowance in a first action issue is completely counter to USPTO policy.

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