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Author Topic: Just as the topic says  (Read 1310 times)

iflog

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Just as the topic says
« on: 09-21-11 at 07:17 pm »

I have an idea for a product that I would like to get produced and marketed. I really have no money to speak of but I have a lot of ideas on how I want to make this product and even how to sell it. Just as the topic says " I have an invention, now what"? Where do I even begin? Is there a step by step book or video? Thanks for any help.
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NJ Patent1

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Re: Just as the topic says
« Reply #1 on: 09-21-11 at 09:18 pm »

iflog:  Sorry I can’t answer your question directly.  But I’ve seen books - lots - on shelves addressing the process.  Maybe try Amazon? (suggestion, not an impimatur for Amazon).  There is probably no shortage.  There are many “invention promotion” companies out there.  Many pimp their products on late-night / early morning TV.  Some such companies may help you, others just take your money, others take your inention and “steal” your invention.  The USPTO website has a section just for individual inventors like you.  I’ve clicked through it, some good advice re: invention promoters, etc.  I’d suggest an hour or two clicking through it as a start. It's free, how often do you get something good free from your government???
I type principally to, I hope, dispel some misconceptions I encounter a lot with individual inventors.  Maybe you share them, maybe not.  One doesn’t get a patent for an “idea”, at least not for an apparatus or composition of matter.  The same generally applies to “ideas” for a method of marketing.  But the state of the law concerning “business method patents” (which would include a method of marketing an invention - but not a "naked idea" for marketing) remains, IMO, in flux.   You said you had an “idea for a product”, and later you said -  I think - you had an “invention”.  They are not the same.  An idea has to be “fleshed out” to be an invention. 
Best wishes
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Patentstudent

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Re: Just as the topic says
« Reply #2 on: 09-22-11 at 10:10 am »

There are many books that may be helpful for you.
One of the most recent ones is 'One simple idea: Turn your dreams into a licensing goldmine while letting others do the work' by Stephen Key.
I've read it and must say it is very practical with lots of actual 'how to' advice.
And I just checked on Amazon. It's only approx. $14. The book has a five star rating now on Amazon based on 125 reviews.
 
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WTF_Over

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Re: Just as the topic says
« Reply #3 on: 09-22-11 at 06:08 pm »

I have an idea for a product that I would like to get produced and marketed. I really have no money to speak of but I have a lot of ideas on how I want to make this product and even how to sell it. Just as the topic says " I have an invention, now what"? Where do I even begin? Is there a step by step book or video? Thanks for any help.

Two ways.

(1)  Watch late night television, take notes during the real estate 'system' informercials.  There's a hispanic dude working out of El Paso that will set you straight.

(2)  Go out to YouTube.  Search Snuggie; take copius notes.
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iflog

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Re: Just as the topic says
« Reply #4 on: 09-24-11 at 06:58 am »

Thanks for the replies. I will check out the book that WTF_Over suggested. As far as the idea (invention), I may not have explained exactly what I was thinking. I see something everyday that irks me and I can picture, in my mind, a way to correct it by making a small simple object. Its not going to sell billions but it will make peoples life easier and I'm sure people will buy it. I can see selling it on one of those infomercials late at night: "Buy 6 for $10 and we'll double your purchase, just pay extra shipping and handling". Even at that price I'm sure it would sell and I know it wouldn't cost much to make (pennies per piece). My original post was to seek information on what exactly to do to get started. Do I make a drawing? Should it be 3D? Do I patent first? Do I make a prototype? Things like this need to be addressed and put in order. #1 do this...#2 do this...#3 do this...etc. Thanks again.
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NJ Patent1

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Re: Just as the topic says
« Reply #5 on: 09-24-11 at 01:04 pm »

iflog:  Good, if you can make a drawing of an article, you have more than a naked idea and potentially patentable subject matter.  There are other hoops to jump throught (e.g. novelty and non-onbiousness). 
1.     Do make good drawings.  A specification of a purely mechanical patent is largely a description of the figures, with an added discussion of how to use the device.  3D figures are not generally allowed.  But, if needed, you can - and most applicants do -submit different views, including cross-section and perspective.  The number of views required depends on the complexity of the device (a “manufacture” in patentspeak). 
2.     The rules say that the USPTO can require a “working model”.  But it is very rare that the Office does so.  A working model might help win-over investors.  But be careful. If you don’t make it yourself, you’ll be “disclosing” the invention to a third party.  Have a confidentiality agreement (“CDA” as many lawyers refer to them) with the machine shop. 
3.     A well-written patent application properly describing and enabling the invention on file at the USPTO provides much greater protection than any CDA.  In fact, many potential investors won’t speak with you unless you have one.  They are afraid you’ll sue them later for stealing your invention.  But at a minimum have a CDA.
4.     Concerning how to proceed, funding, etc., the book(s) referred to by others will probably help.
5.     Concerning invention promotion companies.  If you choose to use one, DO research them before sitting down with them.  Many inventors have gotten screwed.  You can check the USPTO web site for complaints.  You can also check to see how many lawsuits they are / have been involved in.  Google Scholar might work, but this might be better done by a legal professional familiar with legal databases.  A simple search of a database shouldn’t take more than an hour’s time to get a simple listing of civil actions.  Look at it as insurance cost. 
6.     Good luck!  People have made money via infomertials. 
7.     The above are general informational comments, not legal advice. 
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