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Obviousness
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faisal
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thumb rule
« on: Mar 29th, 2005, 4:56am »
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during a discussion someone told me that their is a thumb rule to judge the obvious part of the Invention which is applied while drafting a patent application, but he himself dont explain me the things, if anyone have the idea about it please let me know
« Last Edit: Mar 29th, 2005, 4:58am by faisal » IP Logged
JSonnabend
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Re: thumb rule
« Reply #1 on: Mar 29th, 2005, 9:04am »
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A "rule of thumb" is not a particular rule, per se.  It is an expression meaning a useful principle having wide application but not intended to be strictly accurate or reliable in every situation.
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SonnabendLaw
Intellectual Property and Technology Law
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faisa
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Re: thumb rule
« Reply #2 on: Apr 2nd, 2005, 1:49pm »
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thank you
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faisal
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Re: thumb rule
« Reply #3 on: Apr 7th, 2005, 1:59am »
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so is their any law or rule which is governed to check weather an invention is patentable or not
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JSonnabend
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Re: thumb rule
« Reply #4 on: Apr 7th, 2005, 8:03am »
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RogersDA is correct in his summation.  I'll just add that:
 
  • generally, section 101 can be virtually ignored.
  • section 102 mandates that an invention be "novel", that is, that it not exist before in any context.
  • section 103 says that the invention cannot be "obvious" in light of what has come before.
     
    That's it in a nutshell, although I'm sure Mr. Tran can summarize it more tersely.
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    SonnabendLaw
    Intellectual Property and Technology Law
    Brooklyn, USA
    718-832-8810
    JSonnabend@SonnabendLaw.com
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