The Intellectual Property Law Server

Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register.
Jan 28th, 2023, 12:23am

Forums Forums Help Help Search Search Members Members Calendar Calendar Login Login Register Register
   Intellectual Property Forums
  
  
Patent Filing and Prosecution
(Moderators: Forum Admin, JimIvey, JSonnabend)
   Invention Disclosure diagrams
« Previous topic | Next topic »
Pages: 1 2  Reply Reply Send Topic Send Topic Print Print
   Author  Topic: Invention Disclosure diagrams  (Read 2212 times)
JodiB
Newbie
*




   


Posts: 15
Invention Disclosure diagrams
« on: Aug 27th, 2006, 5:39pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

I'm trying to finish off my invention disclosure with enough details to help in case someday I need to prove first-to-invent (my lab book is quite a mess and computer files might be another form of proof but there I've got periodic backups, so I'd rather have a dated Invention Disclosure).
 
I have a diagram that illustrates the core idea I'd like to patent in over 15 blocks or steps, then I have a preferred embodiment diagram with lots more surrounding details but have labelled 1 block or step as what the core idea is.  Do I need to pull-in or copy-paste the core idea diagram?   Or can I simply add some accompanying text saying something like 'step 320 performs the steps of FIG. 1'.  
 
I've noticed in some patents that they would join 2 diagrams together using things like 320A 320B etc. and so am leaning towards that AND the text.
 
Like I said this is for Invention Disclosure so maybe I'm wasting too much time on this and should just move on in the process.
 
thanks in advance for any help
IP Logged
Bill Richards
Full Member
***




   
WWW Email

Posts: 758
Re: Invention Disclosure diagrams
« Reply #1 on: Aug 27th, 2006, 6:17pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

You're on the right track and wise to consider these issues now (sooner) rather than later.  I would try to be as clear and well-organized as possible.  The best system is a bound notebook with stiched pages that cannot be removed or added to.  Items may be pasted or taped into the notebook, but they should be initialled and dated (preferably across the boundary between the added material and the main page) and they should be done contemporaneously.
Importantly, each entry should be witnessed by someone under a CDA who attests to having read and understood the material.  Uncorroborated evidence of invention is rarely enough.
IP Logged

William B. Richards, P.E.
The Richards Law Firm
Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights
614/939-1488
JimIvey
Moderator
Senior Member
*****




  jamesdivey  
WWW

Posts: 2584
Re: Invention Disclosure diagrams
« Reply #2 on: Aug 27th, 2006, 6:44pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Just to address the specific questions re a figure spanning multiple pages, there are a number of ways to address that.  There's a way that an oversized drawing can be split into parts, each part being shown on a separate page.  I tried to look for an example among my patents, but didn't see any.  The idea is that there are dotted lines that you could cut along and tape the pages together to make a large figure.
 
A better way is to organize your 15 elements hierarchically.  I do that quite a bit.  For example, let's say that the first 5 steps are to accomplish a bigger goal like recover a session state from a previous session (for a web-based application).  You could replace those 5 steps with that one step and then include a later figure that shows that step in greater detail -- by spelling out the five component steps of the session state recovery.
 
The exercise of grouping the bigger picture into fewer steps can help you write broader claims -- suppose a competitor could "recover a previous session state" with slightly different steps than your five.  It also helps you write applications in a preferred sequence: big picture, a little more detail, lastly gory details.
 
Regards.
IP Logged

--
James D. Ivey
Law Offices of James D. Ivey
http://www.iveylaw.com
JodiB
Newbie
*




   


Posts: 15
Re: Invention Disclosure diagrams
« Reply #3 on: Aug 27th, 2006, 7:45pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

on Aug 27th, 2006, 6:44pm, JimIvey wrote:
A better way is to organize your 15 elements hierarchically.  I do that quite a bit.  For example, let's say that the first 5 steps are to accomplish a bigger goal like recover a session state from a previous session (for a web-based application).  You could replace those 5 steps with that one step and then include a later figure that shows that step in greater detail -- by spelling out the five component steps of the session state recovery.

 
Yes exactly but in my case my Preferred Embodiment includes the 15 steps plus a bunch of surrounding stuff (initializing, retrieving data, extra checks, etc...).   In other words, first I talk about the invention (15 steps) then Preferred Embodiment wraps that and has Before and After steps.  So I'm kind of going from fine-detail (invention) to bigger picture (preferred embodiment with accessories of how to make it work) - can/should I in the Preferred Embodiment do some hand-waving and say Box 200 is FIG. 1?
IP Logged
Jonathan
Full Member
***




   


Posts: 611
Re: Invention Disclosure diagrams
« Reply #4 on: Aug 27th, 2006, 8:24pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify


An example of splitting flowcharts onto multiple pages, refer to figures 4a and 4b:
 
http://www.pat2pdf.org/patents/pat20040221104.pdf
 
However, don't follow this example in that they labeled the 'to' and 'from' with incorrect figure nos.
IP Logged
Pages: 1 2  Reply Reply Send Topic Send Topic Print Print

« Previous topic | Next topic »
Powered by YaBB 1 Gold - SP 1.3.2!
Forum software copyright 2000-2004 Yet another Bulletin Board