The Intellectual Property Law Server

Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register.
Dec 13th, 2019, 6:58pm

Forums Forums Help Help Search Search Members Members Calendar Calendar Login Login Register Register
   Intellectual Property Forums
  
  
Patent Agent/Lawyer Careers
(Moderators: Forum Admin, JimIvey, JSonnabend)
   Job Offer Question
« Previous topic | Next topic »
Pages: 1 2  Reply Reply Send Topic Send Topic Print Print
   Author  Topic: Job Offer Question  (Read 2068 times)
nstabler
Newbie
*




   


Posts: 7
Job Offer Question
« on: Jun 19th, 2007, 10:49am »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

I'm looking for entry level experience working on patents. I've recently been interviewing with a couple of firms that do a lot of wholesale patent work, for small firms/companies. They don't have many clients that are large corporations. I've been told that working at these places will not give me valuable experience working on patent applications.
 
Am I wasting my time? Or would these firms be a good job?
 
Thanks
IP Logged
pentazole
Full Member
***




   


Posts: 197
Re: Job Offer Question
« Reply #1 on: Jun 19th, 2007, 2:02pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

If the bulk of your firm's clients are foreign clients, then you will not get much experience.  Most foreign clients, especially east asian clients, require minimal involvement from the US attorneys.  your duties will be making sure that the translations to be filed in the US are proper, that IDS's are filed properly, and in terms of prosecution, they usually send you letters suggesting how to proceed.  It is the easiest way to make money in patent law, but the worst way to advance in your career in patent drafting and prosecution.
 
On the other hand, if the bulk of the clients are domestic, then it's a great opportunity to hone your drafting and prosecution skills.  The size of the company that is your client is not really particularly relevant, but in most cases you will find it more pleasant to deal with smaller companines than with multi billion dollar ones.  The reason being the work is more exciting with the smaller companies.  Small companies don't have a lot of money to spend on IP, and thus won't try to patent every little tiny modification to a composition or process, and as such their applications don't become dull.
IP Logged
MrSnuggles
Full Member
***




   


Posts: 119
Re: Job Offer Question
« Reply #2 on: Jul 2nd, 2007, 1:49pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

The downside to working with small clients is that they don't have large budgets (typically), but they do have large expectations.  A corporate giant that files 1000 applications a year is, to some degree, just trying to get the numbers.  They know that with allowance rates hovering between 15-40% depending on the art group, the more they file, the more likely it is they will get some protectable IP.
 
On the other hand, the small client, with their one or two great ideas that they want to protect with a patent, is "gambling it all" in a sense.  They want the best quality application, and will go through many revisions to get it, regardless of the cost.  However, without a substantial retainer, recovering those costs may prove to be difficult -- especially if the client dissolves.
 
In my experience, having a good mentor is more important than the type of (domestic) client.
IP Logged
patentsusa
Junior Member
**




   
WWW

Posts: 81
Re: Job Offer Question
« Reply #3 on: Jul 2nd, 2007, 9:26pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

What exactly do you mean by wholesale?  If you mean low fixed fee, that means that the supervisors will have less ability to supervise and train because there aren't enough dollars for them to bill their time as well as your time.  Firms that have good clients that will pay full hourly rates will typically be better places to get good training.  Some firms will train better than others regardless of the quality of work they have, but firms that have better quality work will pay more in the long run, because they can bill more.  If a firm is doing a lot of work for one or two large portfolio clients, that may be a bad sign.  The big name companies which huge portfolios are sometimes the worst clients.  There is a lot more satisfaction helping small and medium size companies (that actually manufacture product) grow.  Venture funded companies can make great clients.  Individual inventor clients can be high malpractice risk, low fee, and high effort unless their expectations are managed properly.  
 
But, yes, good training will come down to whether the firm has good trainers more than the type of work that they have.
 
A good trick to use to evaluate a firm is to talk to attorneys who left that firm.  One way to find them is to go to the wayback machine at archive.org, find old versions of the firm's website, and look for attorneys who have left.  Contact those attorneys who have left and they will often provide you with a candid description of the firm they left.  
IP Logged

Deepak Malhotra, JD, BSEE
Registered Patent Attorney
Malhotra Law Firm
www.patentsusa.com
patently_correct
Newbie
*




   


Posts: 3
Re: Job Offer Question
« Reply #4 on: Jul 7th, 2007, 8:59pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Call me at my office on Monday.  I will see if I can help you.  (860) 249-7236, ask for Greg
IP Logged
Pages: 1 2  Reply Reply Send Topic Send Topic Print Print

« Previous topic | Next topic »
Powered by YaBB 1 Gold - SP 1.3.2!
Forum software copyright 2000-2004 Yet another Bulletin Board