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   Stop the Salary Talk
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   Author  Topic: Stop the Salary Talk  (Read 3478 times)
forest
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Posts: 59
Re: Stop the Salary Talk
« Reply #5 on: Nov 2nd, 2006, 11:51am »
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In defense of PhD's everywhere:
 
Please don't make sweeping generalizations which you cannot in any way validate.  
 
There are thousands of reasons why people get their PhD, and even more reasons why they may feel a switch from the bench to the office or elsewhere is more amenable to their lifestyle.
 
Not everyone is salary driven.
 
Not everyone always knows immediately what they want to do. I am sure you, Listentothis, have experienced this at some point in your life. Or, you may just be perfect.
 
Postings like yours, although they may truthfully apply to some, don't necessarily apply to all and, in fact, don't seem to serve any purpose than to disparage and discourage those who might be looking for a new career path.
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"Science is a wonderful thing if one does not have to earn one's living at it." ~Albert Einstein
DavidD
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Posts: 10
Re: Stop the Salary Talk
« Reply #6 on: Nov 3rd, 2006, 1:42pm »
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I can’t agree more with cforest79 and Doc.  There are thousands of reasons why people get their PhD, and even more reasons why many of them decide to go into IP law (either by acquiring a JD degree or just simply passing the patent bar).  To me, it is not really a “switch”, but rather a logical and smart career move for those who have already established a solid foundation in science, and now want to apply their valuable scientific knowledge and technical expertise to the law.  This has been fueled by a growing demand in high-tech companies for experienced scientists with legal knowledge.  In fact, high-tech companies now understand that IP rights are critical to continued investments in R&D, and are among the key tools of entrepreneurs and, in varying degrees, furnish an important foundation for the formation and growth of all companies. Until recently, to help secure patent rights to inventions, high-tech companies assign individuals with scientific expertise within their institutions to work alongside with their legal counsels to help articulate the basis upon which their ideas are novel and deserving of legal protection. However, high-tech executives have recently come to the realization that individuals possessing the combination of technical/scientific background and legal knowledge would be extremely powerful assets.  In many high-tech companies, directors of IP department are not JD but rather the brightest and most successful PhD scientists and engineers.  To those scientists, intellectual property law presents a stimulating and exciting career path that would keep them stay close to science because, almost by definition, they would be still working at the forefront of science and technology.  In other words, they would be exposed to a lot of creative ideas in many new aspects of their research fields, but the best thing would be that they will get to see the cutting edge of technology a couple years before anyone else will. And what true scientist wouldn't like that?  
Having said all that, I still think that seeking information relating to prospective salaries and lifestyle would still be a common-sense thing that any reasonable and responsible person would do prior to making their decision.  Money may not be primary motivation, but any responsible individual has to support their family even when they contemplate a new career path.  In addition, the lifestyle would also be quite different.  The intellectual freedom that one enjoys as a scientist may not be the same when you become a patent practitioner. Therefore, think twice before you make your move and, please do absolutely NOT dive in unless you know exactly you are getting into.
« Last Edit: Nov 7th, 2006, 7:20am by DavidD » IP Logged
Softwary
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Don't stop it yet ---
« Reply #7 on: Nov 9th, 2006, 1:36pm »
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Roll Eyes
Does anyone know the rate a patent attorney contractor is offfered ? A graduate degree in Engineering, about a year of Prosecution, and five years of industary experience ? Huh
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