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   Job market situation for different sci/eng backgr.
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fly2thesun
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Job market situation for different sci/eng backgr.
« on: Apr 19th, 2006, 11:30pm »
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This forum is really interesting and informative. Thank you for all the people who have contributed to this forum..
 
Reading previous posts, I see more bio-science/engineering people aspiring to change their career, than other people with EE or CS background, for example.  And quite a few remarks that the job market for JD/bio-PhDs is quite tough, although the remarks might have been quite old, 2003~2004..
 
Is the job market for bio-IP area still like that? If so, why? Scarce demand or too much supply? Nowadays I hear that bio-related research is hot, so I don't really see why bio-IP area would be tough..  
 
Are the job markets for other IP areas any better? How do the different IP areas compare, like EE/ME/CS/Chem/Bio, etc?
 
As for me, I'm in EE PhD study. I'm a little bit confused by the scarcity of posts for/by EEs.  Huh  Undecided  
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byte
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Re: Job market situation for different sci/eng bac
« Reply #1 on: Apr 20th, 2006, 8:12am »
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I can't comment on the job market for biology-related IP jobs, but from what I know, EE remains one of the hot areas for patent agents.  It's also an area that, unlike the hard sciences, doesn't necessitate an advanced degree beyond a BSEE.
 
Perhaps the scarcity of posts by EEs is purely coincidental, though I will speculate that patent law, at least as an agent, may not be as attractive an option as continuing in EE once you are experienced, since there may be a significant salary decrease if you switched (until you obtain a JD).
« Last Edit: Apr 20th, 2006, 8:13am by byte » IP Logged
Isaac
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Re: Job market situation for different sci/eng bac
« Reply #2 on: Apr 20th, 2006, 9:04am »
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I don't think the lack of posts by EEs is coincidental.  I think that the question of EE/CS opportunities has been answered to the satisfaction of most, while the biotech/life science questions have not been answered here until relatively recently.
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Isaac
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Re: Job market situation for different sci/eng bac
« Reply #3 on: Apr 21st, 2006, 3:21pm »
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There are a lot more job postings for EE and CS people.  All you have to do it look in Intellectual Property today.  About half the postings are for EE and CS.  
 
Although there are more posts for EE, I suspect there's more of a demand for CS.  If you look at a lot of the postings, a portion of the job ads list both EE and CS.   However, there are more ads that list only CS than list only EE.  This leads me to beleive that they're hiring EE people to do easy software patents (e.g.,, interenet site stuff) because there aren't enough CS people.  Moreover, one of my aquantances who had an EE degree and was working at a big firm, spent the majority of his time working on simple computer programs.  I suspect in a lot of these cases the firms would rather hire someone with the CS degree but will take an EE degree instead.  
 
There's probably less lawyers with the CS degree than the EE degree. For one thing it's reletively new, so there aren't a lot of old guys around with one.
 
With regard to why the job market for bio is tougher.  Simple, there's more law school graduates with the biology/chem degree.  Why's this?  People who get a degree in biolog/chemestry are generally planning to go to med school.  If they decide they don't want to be a doctor, you guessed it, they go to law school (or buisness school).  However, people getting a CS or EE degree aren't planning on being doctors or lawyers.  In a lot of cases they're not even planning to do post grad work, and the ones that do tend to stay in the CS or EE field.
 
With regard to mechanical/civil engeneers, the problem is that the patent work is easier to do.  It tends to involve gears turning or reletively simple mechanical stuff.  So, you're better off hiring an EE or CS guy and having him do the occasionaly mechanical patent.  However, the mechanical/civil guys are lost when it comes to EE or CS stuff.
 
Incidently, I heard there's a pretty high demand for pharmacists with a J.D.
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Isaac
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Re: Job market situation for different sci/eng bac
« Reply #4 on: Apr 21st, 2006, 4:22pm »
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on Apr 21st, 2006, 3:21pm, guest wrote:
This leads me to beleive that they're hiring EE people to do easy software patents (e.g.,, interenet site stuff) because there aren't enough CS people.

 
The line between CS and EE can often be fairly blurry.   EEs usually can elect a curriculum that is loaded more towards CS subjects rather than towards more traditional EE topics or vice versa.   It's really not possible to generalize about whether an EE can or cannot handle the less easy software patents.  
 
I think the primary reason for hiring EEs is not the lack of available CS people, but because EEs might be a little easier to keep busy when there is not enough hard CS work to do.  
 
My personal opinion is that CS stuff that is over the head of a software savvy EE is a relatively small portion of the work for most firms.   The inventive portion of the overwhelming majority of software patents just does not involve complex CS subject matter.    Most software patents involve sofware carrying out an inventive method that a non CS major would easily understand.
 
Still, when you have a client to serve that needs CS special expertise, a generic EE won't do.
 
Quote:
There's probably less lawyers with the CS degree than the EE degree. For one thing it's reletively new, so there aren't a lot of old guys around with one.

 
In the old days CS type stuff was taught to math majors.   Those guys ended up having to take a bunch of chemistry and physics courses just to qualify to take the patent bar.
 
Quote:

With regard to mechanical/civil engeneers, the problem is that the patent work is easier to do.  It tends to involve gears turning or reletively simple mechanical stuff.

 
Us EEs and physics majors end up working on simple mechanical inventions, and for the most part MEs have no particular advantage at doing those kinds inventions, but certainly there are ME related inventions that us generic practitioners cannot handle.
 
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Isaac
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