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   Career Change from EE to Patent Lawyer?
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   Author  Topic: Career Change from EE to Patent Lawyer?  (Read 63564 times)
paul1234
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Posts: 13
Re: Career Change from EE to Patent Lawyer?
« Reply #40 on: Aug 25th, 2006, 7:49am »
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i got into howard law school in washington DC and i have exeptance in USPTO office.  
is Howard law school a terriable school  i have a law gpa but a good lsat i have a 2.7 ugpa and 168LSAT.
can you recomend me any thing.  
I also have a GMAT of 700 so i am at a cross roads. What would you recomend stay with my company that would pay me for the MBA and become a manager in indiana or move to Alexandira to USPTO go to law school and become a patent lawyer.
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Pagent
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Posts: 6
Re: Career Change from EE to Patent Lawyer?
« Reply #41 on: Sep 2nd, 2006, 1:52pm »
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I would take the patent bar and start working as a patent agent while in law school. then when graduated from Law School already have 3 years of experience which would be an excellent start as patent lawyer. Roll Eyes
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IE Major
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Re: Career Change from EE to Patent Lawyer?
« Reply #42 on: Jan 22nd, 2007, 10:18pm »
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Hi,
 
I have a BSE with Industrial Engineering specialty.  I have some technical work experience, but most of it has been technical sales.  Does anybody know whether an Industrial Engineering background would befit a career in patent law?  Also, how heavily does your undergraduate GPA factor in law school acceptance?
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Matthew
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Re: Career Change from EE to Patent Lawyer?
« Reply #43 on: Feb 23rd, 2007, 8:49am »
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on Jul 7th, 2006, 8:09pm, CollegeKid wrote:
Hey I was wondering if a mechanical engineer can become a patent lawyer or only EE (i see mostly EEs here)
 
also, does anyone have any info on a typical day for an engineering manager (MBA) vs. patent prosecutor (JD)

 
Yes it is possible, but the market is very small.
 
Generally, there are two ways to firm-based patent law or in-house patent law. You either have to have an EE degree or you have to have a Ph.D. in chemistry or biochemistry. This is because nearly all of the patent work done in the U.S.A. is on electrical devices or drugs/pharmaceuticals.
 
I have heard the breakdown is like this:
50% EE
48% Ph.D. chem/biochem
2% ME and other engineering/science
 
In my opinion, ME is a bad degree. Go back and get a master's in EE.
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Matthew
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Re: Career Change from EE to Patent Lawyer?
« Reply #44 on: Feb 23rd, 2007, 9:13am »
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on Jan 22nd, 2007, 10:18pm, IE Major wrote:
Hi,
 
I have a BSE with Industrial Engineering specialty.  I have some technical work experience, but most of it has been technical sales.  Does anybody know whether an Industrial Engineering background would befit a career in patent law?  Also, how heavily does your undergraduate GPA factor in law school acceptance?

 
EE is the best degree for patent law. GPA is a major factor in law school acceptance. ANYBODY can go to law school. Not anybody can go to a GOOD law school. There are two factors in law school acceptance: LSAT score and GPA. LSAT score is about twice as important as GPA. To a very small extent, letters of recommendation and personal statements can make a difference, but it is nearly all LSAT and GPA. Also, if you are a minority (specifically african-american), you can get in with significantly lower scores and grades.
 
The law school breakdown goes like this (it's all by rankings from USNEWS):
 
Top 5 schools: These are the best schools and job opportunities will be almost identical for any of them. The schools place in the highest paying big law firms and in academia. To get in, you need a GPA around 3.9 and an LSAT score greater than 170. Yale and Harvard are the most highly respected.
 
Schools 6-14: These schools place most graudates in big firms, but not as well the top 5. Academia is tougher to get into from these, but still possible. These are national schools are you can be hired by a big firm in any part of the country. LSAT scores of 165 and GPA of 3.7 are the absolute minimum for these schools.
 
Schools 15-20: Regional schools. These schools place in big firms regionally. More difficult to get a job out of region. Min LSAT/GPA: 165/3.7
 
Schools 20-50: These round out the 'first tier' schools. The lower the ranking, the easier to get in. Job opportunities largely depend on class rank on graduation. Big firms are still possible if you are top 10% of graduating class. LSAT/GPA of 162/3.4 or so should get you into to at least 1.
 
Schools 50-100: 'Second tier' schools. Generally regarded as good schools with well-established track records. These schools place graduates well locally. It is very difficult to break into big-law in a big city market. LSATs can drop into the 150s and a GPA above 3.0 should get you accepted somewhere. Do not expect to make much money starting out from one of these schools.
 
Third Tier Schools: These schools are unranked and grouped together. They essentially are all the same. If you are considering one of these, take the one that will be the cheapest for you to go to. Generally, most people will advise you not to go to law school if these are the best schools you can get into. LSATs above 150 are generally required. GPA can be in the <3.0 range.
 
Fourth Tier Schools: Also unranked. These are the worst law schools in the country. Generally they are small, recent, independent start-ups and are profit-driven. Competition in the schools is fierce as many students will fail out. It is very difficult to get a job on graduation, and because of the subpar education, many graduates are unable to pass the bar. A successful career in law (namily personal injury law) is still possible from one of these schools, but connections and personal wealth are generally needed. GPA and LSAT score don't really matter, you just need to have one of both.
 
Unaccredited law schools: These law schools are yet to be accredited by the ABA. You cannot sit for the bar until the school becomes accredited. Most of these schools are scams. A small few are legitimate as a respected university is beginning to open a brand new law school.
 
 
The general advice is that law school is only worth taking out loans for if you get into a tier 1 school (top 50) and really want to be a lawyer. If you want to be a big firm lawyer, go to the highest ranked tier 1 you get into. A full ride to a tier-2 may be worth considering. Don't bother with tier 3 and lower.
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