The Intellectual Property Law Server

Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register.
Jun 4th, 2020, 11:29am

Forums Forums Help Help Search Search Members Members Calendar Calendar Login Login Register Register
   Intellectual Property Forums
  
  
Patent Agent/Lawyer Careers
(Moderators: Forum Admin, JimIvey, JSonnabend)
   science grad looking for advice
« Previous topic | Next topic »
Pages: 1  Reply Reply Send Topic Send Topic Print Print
   Author  Topic: science grad looking for advice  (Read 1161 times)
confusa
Newbie
*




   


Posts: 1
science grad looking for advice
« on: Mar 1st, 2005, 3:56pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Is it necessary to have a PhD in biochemistry (i have a masters) to end up doing patent law, especially if one likes the prosecution bit? (My prof. is taking off before I can finish my PhD so I am wondering whether I should continue it elsewhere or simply land up in law school)?
 
do patent lawyers (prosecution side) ACTUALLY end up working more than 60 hrs per week (this is of concern to us females with babies?)
IP Logged
DB
Newbie
*




   


Posts: 19
Re: science grad looking for advice
« Reply #1 on: Mar 23rd, 2005, 7:24pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Although a PhD is certainly not necessary to become a good patent prosecutor and I know a number of patent agents that have master degress in the biological sciences, the reality these days is that in the biological sciences/biotechnology side a PhD is essential to land a job.  The main reason for this "requirement" is two fold, 1. Firms like to have PhDs on hand because they can easily communicate with scientists and clients who mostly have PhDs themselves. 2. In recent years, a number of highly qualified PhD grads, post-docs, research scientists, and professors have succesfully made the transition to patent law.  As such, by not pursuing your PhD, you will be in essence, at a disadvantage compared to all those PhDs who will also be looking for jobs.
 
As many other posters have mentioned in other threads, patent prosecution in a law firm setting does require long hours.  It would not be unreasonable for a patent prosecutor at a big IP firm to work close to 60 hours a week in order to make their billable hours (bewteem 1800-2000 per year).  In addition, most technical specialists (PhDs working as patent prosecutors at IP firms) are highly encouraged (or even required) to attend law school at night (if so, your billable hours quota is reduced but your time away from family/home is increased).  Thus, tech specs working in IP firms do end up working pretty hard.
 
If you dont want to pursue your PhD and dont want to work over 60 hours a week, but still want to enter patent law, perhaps you should consider the following career path.  Get a job as a research tech at a company with a thriving IP department/portfolio.  Work at the bench for a couple of years and learn the company's science/technology.  Then try to transition to the IP department.  Tech Specs/patent agents working in-house do not have billable hour requirements, and you would have a leg up (by already been part of the company) in landing a job in the IP department.  However, be sure that the company you choose does do a lot of prosecution in-house...as you can probably imagine, IP firms end up doing a large percentage of patent prosecution for large companies.....
 
GOOD LUCK!  
 
D
IP Logged
vincent todarello
Guest
Re: science grad looking for advice
« Reply #2 on: Mar 23rd, 2005, 11:50pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify Remove Remove

I say get the PhD - I have having a terrible time finding a job and I am already a registered patent attorney that graduated in the top 15% of my class.  I just have a 4 year degree right out of college.  However, I have a few friends that landed jobs just fine even with the 4 year degree only.  1st year grades really make a difference in the legal world.
IP Logged
Pages: 1  Reply Reply Send Topic Send Topic Print Print

« Previous topic | Next topic »
Powered by YaBB 1 Gold - SP 1.3.2!
Forum software copyright 2000-2004 Yet another Bulletin Board