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   What does (for physics majors) mean?
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rglarson13
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What does (for physics majors) mean?
« on: Jul 9th, 2007, 7:27pm »
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I'm a soon-to-be 1L, and I'm interested in becoming a patent attorney.  Unfortunately, my undergrade degree was in math, so I need to make up some coursework before I can take the patent exam.
 
I noticed that I can take 24 credits of physics, which isn't too difficult, but it says (for physics majors).
 
Does that mean only courses applicable for physics majors, (as opposed to survey of physics, history of phyiscs, physics for liberal arts, etc.) or does that mean upper-division courses (300-400 level?)
 
And, if it means upper-division, which is what I'm fearing, then do the lower-division courses still apply to Option C, or whatever it is (the 40 hours of science?)
 
I'm taking the first two intro physics lab courses right now, for a total of 8 credits.  I've also taken 4 credits of intro chemistry lab, and I've taken two computer science courses (one for programming, the other for cryptology/number theory, for a total of 9 credits)  
 
Also, I heard a rumor that, although they only accept comp sci degrees from ABET-accredited schools, they accept coursework from schools that arent, if you're going the 40-credits route.  Is that the case, or will my comp-sci classes not count?
 
I'm actually working as a computer programmer right now, and although I'm not really having any trouble with the physics courses, I know I'd have a lot more fun with the comp sci courses.  And I'll be taking these courses concurrently with law classes, and I know I'll have an easier time with them, too.
 
Does anything that I've done so far count towards qualifying to take the patent exam, or am I just up a creek?  What would you do if you were me?
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still_studying
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Re: What does (for physics majors) mean?
« Reply #1 on: Jul 9th, 2007, 8:25pm »
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Quote:
Does that mean only courses applicable for physics majors, (as opposed to survey of physics, history of phyiscs, physics for liberal arts, etc.) or does that mean upper-division courses (300-400 level?)

They don't have to be upper-level, but they do have to count toward a physics degree.  "History of Physics" probably would NOT count, unless your college allowed such a course to count toward the degree.
 
Quote:

Also, I heard a rumor that, although they only accept comp sci degrees from ABET-accredited schools, they accept coursework from schools that arent, if you're going the 40-credits route.  Is that the case, or will my comp-sci classes not count?

IIRC, the requirements state that the courses have to involve theory, not just how-to-use-this-tool type classes.  "CS121 Intro to C++" probably wouldn't count;  "CS011 Using Excel for Business Majors" definitely wouldn't count;  "CS520 Compiler Design Theory" would count.
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rglarson13
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Re: What does (for physics majors) mean?
« Reply #2 on: Jul 9th, 2007, 9:21pm »
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Sweet!  That's what I was hoping and praying the case would be, but I was afraid it wouldn't be the case.
 
So, to recap and confirm:
 
I'm taking classes at the Univ. of Minnesota, and the physics major there requires something like ten 4-credit courses, of which I'm planning to take the first six, for a total of 24 credits.
 
I'm taking 1301 & 1302 (Physics for Science and Engineering I & II) right now, then I'll have to take 2503 (Modern Physics), 2601 (Quantum Physics) and two others at the 3000/4000-level.
 
You're telling me that this will work out just fine?  
 
That makes my day!
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mr.physics
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Re: What does (for physics majors) mean?
« Reply #3 on: Jul 9th, 2007, 10:33pm »
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on Jul 9th, 2007, 9:21pm, rglarson13 wrote:
I'm taking 1301 & 1302 (Physics for Science and Engineering I & II) right now, then I'll have to take 2503 (Modern Physics), 2601 (Quantum Physics) and two others at the 3000/4000-level.

Those courses will work just fine as the 1301/02 course sequence looks like the standard calculus-based intro to physics that you would find as a physics major at any university.
 
Best of luck!
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rglarson13
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Re: What does (for physics majors) mean?
« Reply #4 on: Jul 10th, 2007, 6:30am »
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Awesome!  Thank you both for your help!
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