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Isaac
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Re: Physics Major
« Reply #5 on: Jun 15th, 2007, 10:51am »
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on Jun 14th, 2007, 9:50pm, EricRM wrote:
Just sufficient? Even though Physics is one of the most versatile subjects available?

 
Physics is a comprehensive subject but particular physic majors don't get credit for having mastered all of physics.   Instead employers may find it necessary to probe into what a physic major has actually studied or practiced.   There are also probably a few cases where a perfectly capable physics major doesn't get past a screener who is looking for an "EE/CS" degree on the resume.
 
That said, I work along side an attorney with a physics background who likely can handle any electrical engineering case I can handle, and I've interviewed physics major candidates who I've recommended hiring to fill an "EE" attorney's spot.
 
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Isaac
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Re: Physics Major
« Reply #6 on: Jun 16th, 2007, 11:15pm »
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I appreciate the feedback too because I am applying to law school this fall.  My undergraduate degree was in physics, and my MS is in Bioengineering for medical devices, the life sciences, medical imaging, advanced math, and technical writing.  I took a lot of courses in advanced biochemistry because I almost applied for a PhD but switched directions to law.  I have about 8 years work experience in medical devices, software testing, and clinical information systems.
 
The problem with engineering is that I have had to move around the country to stay employed.  The 2001-2002 recession was ridiculously harsh.  At this point, I am expected to go into mid-level management, which I don't want.  So I hope to switch to patent law.  I see both positive and negative feedback on the forums, but a JD  really does seem to be a great option at this point.  The LSAT also looks fairly straightforward.  Logic games are not as hard as Maxwell's Equations taught by an MIT physicist.
 
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Re: Physics Major
« Reply #7 on: Jun 17th, 2007, 12:12am »
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on Jun 16th, 2007, 11:15pm, biomed_engr_fl wrote:
I appreciate the feedback too because I am applying to law school this fall.  My undergraduate degree was in physics, and my MS is in Bioengineering for medical devices, the life sciences, medical imaging, advanced math, and technical writing.  I took a lot of courses in advanced biochemistry because I almost applied for a PhD but switched directions to law.  I have about 8 years work experience in medical devices, software testing, and clinical information systems.
 
The problem with engineering is that I have had to move around the country to stay employed.  The 2001-2002 recession was ridiculously harsh.  At this point, I am expected to go into mid-level management, which I don't want.  So I hope to switch to patent law.  I see both positive and negative feedback on the forums, but a JD  really does seem to be a great option at this point.  The LSAT also looks fairly straightforward.  Logic games are not as hard as Maxwell's Equations taught by an MIT physicist.
 

 
 
"Logic games are not as hard as Maxwell's Equations taught by an MIT physicist"......hmmm...I'm an EE and have taken electromagnetics, taught by an MIT Electrical Engineer.  While maxwell's equations are tough in itself, they are a different breed from the LSAT and even the logic games sections.  Do not get ****y about the LSAT, trust me......logic games are easier to master for an engineer, but good luck on reading comp/analytical sections - psych/english majors have us beat on these...
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biomed_engr_fl
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Re: Physics Major
« Reply #8 on: Jun 17th, 2007, 8:49pm »
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I took the electricity of magnetism with 2nd-year graduate students in physics that required 7 semesters of calculus as a prerequisite, and it was the hardest class I've ever had.  See "Classical Electrodynamics" by JD Jackson.  I recall sitting for 6-8 hours in one day simply to solve a few problems whereas I spent about 20 minutes solving a couple of logic game sets.  That was the basis of my comparison for logic games.  
 
I agree that English majors have an advantage for reading comprehension.  On the GRE, I definitely struggled more with the vocabulary questions for analogies and antonyms.  But the math was easy.  I think that is common for engineers on these standardized tests.  Since I took the GRE last month, it feels like it helped to prepare for the LSAT reading comprehension.  The LSAT seems straightforward at this point.
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