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   Going from JD to Engineering to Patent
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   Author  Topic: Going from JD to Engineering to Patent  (Read 4456 times)
lawyertopatent
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Re: Going from JD to Engineering to Patent
« Reply #5 on: Jun 9th, 2007, 7:55am »
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on Jun 9th, 2007, 7:32am, aa wrote:

 
 
 
The problem is that a BA and BS degree have such different requirements that your assumption that a large amount of coursework from your BA will help you fill the requirements of a BS, but this is probably not true. I'm thinking more like 3 years, but you would really have to look at a particular schools requirements.  
 
Just something to think about and plan for. At a certain point the opportunity cost is not worth it.
 

 
AA,
 
Yeah you could be right, but here's what I'm thinking.  I've already taken Calculus 1 and 2 (albeit quite some time ago).  If I brush up on that on my own those can count.  Plus, I can take classes in the summer and get it done faster.  That was my plan, we'll see how it works out, I need to speak to the Fin Aid and Eng. Departments.
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guest23423
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Re: Going from JD to Engineering to Patent
« Reply #6 on: Jun 9th, 2007, 9:14am »
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I went back and got a BSEE after law school.  However, i already had a BS in an unrelated engineering discipline.  It took me a little over 2 years and i had all the required math, physics, etc. courses.  If you have all the gen ed requirements already, this means all of your courses will be physics, EE, math, or CSC courses.  Good luck taking more than 4 or possibly 5 a semester.  This degree in my opinion was much harder than law school or my other engineering degree.  It is a different world compared to law school or your undergraduate experience in poly sci or whatever.  I don't think non-eng majors quite understand what is involved, but I guarantee you will not finish a BSEE in less than 3 years and that's full-time.  I don't mean to discourage you, but I don't think you have a realistic view.  There are probably better options for you to pursue.  However, don't try to pursue a MSEE with a non-eng major.  People in the field know that an MSEE with a non-eng BS only understands a small area of EE and most likely doesn't have a sufficiently broad EE base knowledge.
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plex
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Re: Going from JD to Engineering to Patent
« Reply #7 on: Jun 9th, 2007, 9:49am »
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Most importantly, a MSEE doesn't qualify you for the patent bar.
 
As others have said, it is perfectly possible to take a second degree later.
 
Also as others have said, you won't be able to transfer a lot of credits, and normally an EE degree takes 4.5-5 years going full time, it has a lot more credit requirements than a BA. If you have Calc I/II done (and they accept both calc I and II and don't just start you in calc II as I expect they would), you will be able to also transfer over whatever liberal arts credits they allow and that would be it. At my school, that would have been seven classes at most, which is about 3/4 of a year of classes. I am sure there are engineering courses, perhaps at schools with a broader selection of programs, which will allow you to transfer enough so you get a whole year. That still leaves you with 3.5-4 years of full time classes, and the most difficult of the classes as well.
 
As you mentioned, you can go summers as well, I would imagine this would drop it down to 3 years if you found just the right school that lets you transfer lots of credits, has a significant summer program, you manage to get exactly the classes you need each term and don't fail a single one, until perhaps near the end when you will be taking the engineering electives. Failing a class may seem like a foreign idea, but engineering classes, of which, EE is the most difficult, tend to cover very difficult material and many professors use bell curves. The attrition rate at engineering schools is much higher than other types of schools, mine was probably unusually high, but it should give you an idea, it was 40%. So be prepared for it, it will be much more difficult than anything you have done before.
« Last Edit: Jun 9th, 2007, 9:53am by plex » IP Logged
aa
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Re: Going from JD to Engineering to Patent
« Reply #8 on: Jun 9th, 2007, 11:07am »
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on Jun 9th, 2007, 7:55am, lawyertopatent wrote:

 
AA,
 
Yeah you could be right, but here's what I'm thinking.  I've already taken Calculus 1 and 2 (albeit quite some time ago).  If I brush up on that on my own those can count.  Plus, I can take classes in the summer and get it done faster.  That was my plan, we'll see how it works out, I need to speak to the Fin Aid and Eng. Departments.

 
Another option is to qualify for the patent bar under Catagory B, where you just take 24 credits of physics and can sit for the bar since you technically have a "bachelors degree in another subject". Since you have calculus you could easily finish in a year. I'm not sure firms would like that very much, but you would be able to prosecute patents before the Office. Its just a thought.
 
I'm interested in your situation because my wife is starting law school at a top-25 school but has a political science degree. She wishes now that she had a technical degree. I'll probably be following next year, but not at a top-school unless i ace the LSAT. Doubtful.
 
 
 
 
« Last Edit: Jun 9th, 2007, 11:16am by aa » IP Logged
daven
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Re: Going from JD to Engineering to Patent
« Reply #9 on: Jun 9th, 2007, 12:04pm »
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on Jun 9th, 2007, 11:07am, aa wrote:

 
Another option is to qualify for the patent bar under Catagory B, where you just take 24 credits of physics and can sit for the bar since you technically have a "bachelors degree in another subject". Since you have calculus you could easily finish in a year. I'm not sure firms would like that very much, but you would be able to prosecute patents before the Office. Its just a thought.
 

 
That's definitely the fastest route to the patent exam.
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