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   question about physics courses under option 4
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   Author  Topic: question about physics courses under option 4  (Read 729 times)
squaredeux
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question about physics courses under option 4
« on: May 29th, 2007, 12:57pm »
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i've always been intrinsically inclined to study computer science but for whatever reasons i majored in history and political science in college. i think i was burnt out finishing up engineering level math classes when i was 15 and 16 yrs old.
 
i was admitted 2 yrs ago and come this fall i will have 2+ years of solid litigation experience behind me. mostly commercial litigation (including trade secret) and labor/employment.
 
i've already decided that i want to pursue IP and have further decided to pass the USPTO examination.
 
initially, my options were to either get a 2nd bachelor's at a UC or get a masters at a Cal State. I've decided for the latter.  I fell that this is more technically feasible - getting a masters is more suited for people like me (majored in something non-engineering.)  Further, the costs are extremely favorable going to a cal state.
 
with that said, i know that a master's itself does not qualify you to sit for the USTPO exam. however, getting a master's in CS at a cal state basically "requires" you to have a "similar" level of competence as one would getting a bachelor's in CS.  Therefore, i plan to take a lot of my prereqs at community colleges and then take the remaining prereqs and masters level classes at the cal state.
 
when all my prereqs are done (and i plan to take 2 physics classes) i should qualify to take the USPTO examination. according to my calculations, if i start this fall i should qualify to sit for the exam around december 2008.
 
finally, my question is about the physics classes. my local community college offers 2 physics "series".  
 
The first such series is the Physics 2A and 2B set.  Each class is 4 units long, has a required lab, and are in sequential order.  The description of the first class is as follows:  This course is intended for students in the sciences and related subjects who are required to complete a physics course based on precalculus mathematics.  
 
The second series is the Physics 4A, 4B and 4C set.  Each class is also 4 units long, has a required lab and are in sequential order.  The description of the first class is as follows:  This is a calculus-based introduction to classical mechanics.  
 
would anyone know off the top of their head, if either of these would qualify under option 4?
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mr.physics
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Re: question about physics courses under option 4
« Reply #1 on: May 29th, 2007, 2:16pm »
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on May 29th, 2007, 12:57pm, squaredeux wrote:
The first such series is the Physics 2A and 2B set.  Each class is 4 units long, has a required lab, and are in sequential order.  The description of the first class is as follows:  This course is intended for students in the sciences and related subjects who are required to complete a physics course based on precalculus mathematics.  
 
The second series is the Physics 4A, 4B and 4C set.  Each class is also 4 units long, has a required lab and are in sequential order.  The description of the first class is as follows:  This is a calculus-based introduction to classical mechanics.

For sure, the 4A/B/C sequence should satisfy option 4 as long as you meet the 8 credit hour mark, which it sounds like you could do with just 4A/B (I assume 4A = mechanics, 4B = E&M, 4C = modern).  This is the standard intro course format for physics majors.
 
I'm not sure about the 2A/B sequence solely because I'm not sure if the PTO views physics without calculus as being geared toward "non-science" majors.
 
Hopefully someone else can provide more insight on the latter.
 
Best of luck.
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