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   Author  Topic: Undergraduate Physics Student  (Read 955 times)
GAWoodall
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Undergraduate Physics Student
« on: Nov 28th, 2006, 8:45am »
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I am currently an undergrad physics student and am thinking about becoming a patent attorney.   I just have a few questions.
 
1)  Is a B.S. in Physics sufficient?
 
2)  Is a Physics degree even the way to go if I want to go into Intellectual Property?
 
3)  What is the starting salary in the some large to medium sized southeastern cities  (i.e. Atlanta, Houston,...)
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Zinger
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Re: Undergraduate Physics Student
« Reply #1 on: Dec 10th, 2006, 8:51am »
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1.) A B.S. is sufficient.  As far as physics, see #2.
 
2.)  Physics is probably not the easiest route.  Although, it is certainly doable.  The "hottest" degrees right now are EE, CompE, and even CompSci.  I suggest you figure out the cities you might want to work.  Do a google search and find 5-10 firms in the area.  Look at their bio pages and see what kind of degrees are popular.  That will give you the best answer.  Better yet, if you find someone with a physics background, email them and ask them some questions on how they made it to where they are.   Most patent attorney and agents are very approachable and willing to give you advice.
 
3.)  In Houston, expect $110k-125k at the boutiques.  $135k-145k at the larger firms (although it appears many of these firms are shying away from patent prosecution and focusing more on litigation).
 
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justtryingtohelp
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Re: Undergraduate Physics Student
« Reply #2 on: Dec 27th, 2006, 8:08am »
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Does your school have a 3-2 engineering program where you can get two bachelor's degrees in 5 years? You can major in physics at one school, and then transfer to another after your third year and then get an EE degree. If you are already majoring in physics, I think it's worth it to spend an extra year to get an EE degree.
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Wiscagent
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Re: Undergraduate Physics Student
« Reply #3 on: Dec 27th, 2006, 1:25pm »
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One recurring theme in these advice to the student threads is that Computer Science is "hot", or perhaps it's Electrical Engineering that is "hot".  My suggestion, and I will not mention it again in this forum, is:
 
             Don't chase after this year’s hot specialty.
 
Whatever is hottest today will cool.  Study what is of interest to you.  Study what you enjoy.  Study an area where you have a strong aptitude.  It can't hurt to take some classes in the currently hot area ... but don't let someone's perception of the job market in 2006 persuade you to study a subject so that you can get a job in 2010 (or 2020 or 2030).
 
Anyway ... that's my perception as a mere chemist.
« Last Edit: Dec 27th, 2006, 1:26pm by Wiscagent » IP Logged

Richard Tanzer
Patent Agent
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