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Becoming a Patent Agent/Lawyer
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Isaac
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Re: interview assistance
« Reply #10 on: Dec 5th, 2006, 1:41pm »
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on Dec 5th, 2006, 11:35am, unbody wrote:
I recommend talking to any and all recruiters available if you're looking for a job. I've never landed a position through a recruiter but I know of no real pitfalls.

 
The biggest pitfall with working with a recruiter is that the recruiter can essentially eliminate some chances of getting hired.   A recruiter shopping you to firm for a commission will create a situation where a firm that might hire you without the commission cannot do so.
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Isaac
unbody
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Re: interview assistance
« Reply #11 on: Dec 6th, 2006, 12:10pm »
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Regarding:
The biggest pitfall with working with a recruiter is that the recruiter might eliminate some chances of getting hired.   A recruiter shopping you to an employer for a commission might create a situation where an employer that might hire you without the commission cannot do so.  
 
It's the wisdom of that common wisdom that I challenge. It's sounds like an urban myth to me. That wisdom seems to have a catch-22 in it. If the employer is talking to the recruiter, I would think the employer is aware of and is accepting of the commission. Employers wanting to avoid the commission probably don't talk to recruiters. I don't think recruiters cold-call or blanket-market your credentials around to lay down squatters rights on your candidacy across a market. Maybe I'm wrong ... but can anyone give us testimony to a realization of the situation this common wisdom ominously predicts?
 
Again, under concern that a recruiter's fee might exert down-pressure on my candidacy, I've told recruiters that certain areas of the country ... like my own regional backyard ... are mine without their help. If you want to do your own legwork for in-house jobs, tell the recruiters not to contact in-house practices. If you want to concentrate your legwork on firms, tell the recruiters they can only touch in-house contacts. That way, they're not out there looking for contacts that you would likely find without a recruiter. So that's my work-around. Make sure the recuiter works for you. Clarify with the recruiters their limits.
 
So, regarding the biggest pitfall above, can anyone give us testimony to a particular realization of the situation this common wisdom ominously predicts?
 
 
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Isaac
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Re: interview assistance
« Reply #12 on: Dec 6th, 2006, 12:20pm »
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on Dec 6th, 2006, 12:10pm, unbody wrote:
If the employer is talking to the recruiter, I would think the employer is aware of and is accepting of the commission. Employers wanting to avoid the commission probably don't talk to recruiters.

 
I can tell you that firms generally do not pay commissions for inexperienced patent attorneys and agents. If a recruiter represents such a candidate to a firm that isn't going to pay, most likely the candidate won't be hired there because the result will be a dispute about whether the recruiter is to be paid.   This can also happen if you are experienced, but don't possess the experience the firm wants.  I've had a couple recruiters tell me one version or another of that story.   I also had a recruiter follow up with me once to find out if she should have been paid after I found my own job.
 
Quote:
I don't think recruiters cold-call or blanket-market your credentials around to lay down squatters rights on your candidacy across a market.

 
I agree. My experience is that recruiters check with you before sending your name to a firm. If you are a candidate that a firm is willing to pay for and you agree to have your name sent to that firm, there is no downside. But I'm guessing that description doesn't apply to everyone participating in this thread.
 
« Last Edit: Dec 6th, 2006, 12:24pm by Isaac » IP Logged

Isaac
SeanUMD
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Re: interview assistance
« Reply #13 on: Dec 7th, 2006, 10:58am »
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I posted on this earlier.  I am getting my Ph.D in a couple of weeks and have already been hired by a law firm as a tec spec.  
 
How did I get three interviews in 2 months time with no IP law experience?   Well, first I didn't send out one cover letter + resume to anyone.  I e-mailed patent attorneys with similar backgrounds as me and attached my resume to the e-mail.  In most cases they had a Ph.D and decided to enter IP just as I expect to.  I got replies back from almost all the e-mails that I sent out.  Some of the attorneys just wanted to talk, but others liked my background and shared my resume with their partners and the next thing I know they were calling me on the phone for an interview.  Even in the cases where attorneys wanted to talk I viewed this as a perfect situation to do some informational interviewing where someone might know someone that has an opening.  
 
You might want to try this approach.  Others on this board might say I'm crazy, but it worked for me.
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forest
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Re: interview assistance
« Reply #14 on: Dec 7th, 2006, 11:26am »
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SeanUMD (and others):
 
Thanks for the insight. One question I have for you is do you intend on becoming a patent attorney and, if so, when do you plan on starting law school?
 
I recently took the LSAT and am presently applying to several schools in NY, DC, etc on a part-time basis. Once I am into schools, I plan on further extending my contact base and reaching out to attorneys in firms by the schools I have been accepted to in an attempt to secure a tech spec position during the days, similar to what you have done. There is just no way I'll be able to afford school full-time without working.  
 
I am just unsure if this strategy will work. Does anyone know whether firms would be more or less inclined to hire someone in a technical capacity if they are enrolled part-time in school? I would think this is more favorable, but am unsure. Some of the firms I originally contacted suggested that I get in touch with them again if I am enrolled in a local law school.
 
Thanks to everyone,
 
Forest
 
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