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   If I pass, I'm quitting law school
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   Author  Topic: If I pass, I'm quitting law school  (Read 10132 times)
Isaac
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Re: If I pass, I'm quitting law school
« Reply #25 on: Oct 10th, 2006, 3:51pm »
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on Oct 10th, 2006, 3:46pm, Patent Agent for Real wrote:
You are now ... a law firm patent agent.

 
Did he say where he was working?
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Isaac
patento
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Re: If I pass, I'm quitting law school
« Reply #26 on: Oct 10th, 2006, 5:49pm »
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I am not sure if a corp will hire a patent agent with no experience (perhaps you may want to spit on my face by posting a link to a job opening at a corp requiring no experience). So, true or not, it was a good guess.
 
on Oct 10th, 2006, 3:51pm, Isaac wrote:

 
Did he say where he was working?

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Isaac
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Re: If I pass, I'm quitting law school
« Reply #27 on: Oct 10th, 2006, 6:37pm »
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on Oct 10th, 2006, 5:49pm, patento wrote:
I am not sure if a corp will hire a patent agent with no experience (perhaps you may want to spit on my face by posting a link to a job opening at a corp requiring no experience). So, true or not, it was a good guess.
 

 
 
Don't want to spit in anyone's face...
 
My first job was at a small firm where the prosecution was handled primarily by some very senior patent agents while the junior agents and attorneys were primarily writing applications.    I never got the impression that the agents were getting the short end of the stick.
 
There are also a few firms in the DC area where all of the practitioners are patent agents.
 
Maybe the situation is really the "village of the damned" and maybe I'm just naive, but there seems to be scant evidence of what Markush's lot really is.
 
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Isaac
biopico
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Re: If I pass, I'm quitting law school
« Reply #28 on: Oct 10th, 2006, 7:16pm »
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Although Markush's earlier posts seem to suggest that he might have got a job in a firm, what seems important to him is to get his debt paid and then do something better.  At this point, he is happy because he will be making money very soon.  Good luck!
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ChrisWhewell
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Re: If I pass, I'm quitting law school
« Reply #29 on: Oct 11th, 2006, 5:13pm »
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I feel your frustration, and your argument has some merit --- it's a tough dichotomy for some to resolve. As an Agent, you will likely never engage in a licensing negotiation.  Of course as an Agent one cannot do any contract work.  Also, writing NDA's is a no-no as well.  Add to this that you cannot do any trademark or copyright work either.  Also, no opinion work.  Everytime someone asks you whether what they want to do infringes patent X, you'll have to say that you're not qualified to render a legal opinion.  Plus, everytime someone asks you if you're a patent atty, you'll have to tell them that you're an Agent, and explain the difference between a lawyer and Agent, a hundred times over.  Abouth the 99th time, you'll may find yourself reaching for a cyanide capsule.  These limitations restrict ones upward mobility, unless one can make up for it in other areas; but in such case where they could make up for it in other areas, they're not truly a legal person at heart, which seems to be an inherent contradiction.
 
Looking at most of the job listings, Agents are called for much less than lawyers, because companies deem it valuable to pay the extra money to obtain highly skilled, versatile workers.   However, if one is happy with being limited to writing and prosecution work, and they realize it as their calling, then they may be wise for that.  Beware, the ailment known as "prosecution burnout" !  I had it once, it is painful, and you are likely to get it at some point.
 
As with everything, creative and inquisitive people being what they are, we eventually become bored with what we do.  At least I do, I always need more challenges !  An attorney has greater capacity to adapt and grow to new and changing situations, thus reducing the propensity for boredom 15 years down the road.  With more experience comes more responsibility and higher level challenges, which keeps you going.
 
There is a difference between an Agent, and a good, experienced Agent.   In my experience, good Agents are scarce.  Case law is constantly changing.  CLE is required as a minimum.   You're best teacher is experience though.
 
I became registered in '93.  In 1997 I was hired as the sole practitioner for a $ 700MM polymer manufacturer, and initially worked for R&D, not legal.  I was lucky ---- they kept me, and I stayed on with the $10B company that bought them for several years.  When they left town, I elected to stay here, for family reasons.   I have probably done better than most, as a patent agent, but I worked very hard for a long time.  I could have never done it in a law firm environment.  The key to success in life is  working hard and helping people.
 
Being an Agent is neither bad nor good in and of itself.   It is up to the person.  A good agent is better than a crummy lawyer, and a good lawyer can run circles around a typical agent.   Lawyers are overall more versatile than agents.  Plus, law school can sharpen the mind of some, and can enable one to literally eat through contracts.   Let us not forget, patents are contracts.  
 
Good luck in your trails.  If I were you, I may not have quit.  Remember the Italian's discovery of the "mirror neurons" (google it).   But, it is probably the right thing for you, if that is where your heart is.  Still, you might entertain going back and telling them you had a Maalox (TM) moment and want to finish the semester.  You could have a change of heart, some claim prayer leads to revelation.  Don't let the b_____s grind you down !!!  Just study your nootz off and get the JD.
 
 
 
 
 
 
« Last Edit: Oct 12th, 2006, 6:34am by ChrisWhewell » IP Logged

Chris Whewell, M.S.
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