The Intellectual Property Law Server

Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register.
Jan 29th, 2023, 12:07am

Forums Forums Help Help Search Search Members Members Calendar Calendar Login Login Register Register
   Intellectual Property Forums
  
  
Becoming a Patent Agent/Lawyer
(Moderators: Forum Admin, JimIvey, JSonnabend)
   Biotech - How to Start
« Previous topic | Next topic »
Pages: 1  Reply Reply Send Topic Send Topic Print Print
   Author  Topic: Biotech - How to Start  (Read 757 times)
Sparky
Guest
Biotech - How to Start
« on: Jul 8th, 2005, 12:33pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify Remove Remove

I have a Bachelor's from a great school in Neurobiology, a JD from another great school, and am admitted to the Patent Bar.  
 
I've been practicing Health Law for several years but still feel drawn to IP and more technical work.  
 
I see that not having an advanced degree is a huge disadvantage, primarily because of market demand, not because it's essential to do the work.  
 
Can anyone suggest concrete steps I can take to transition into Biotech practice?  Should I pursue an MS?  Is there other good training available?  How can I get my foot in the door?
IP Logged
PiP
Junior Member
**




   


Posts: 74
Re: Biotech - How to Start
« Reply #1 on: Jul 8th, 2005, 1:40pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Sparky, I must preface this by saying that I am not an attorney and am just about to start law school after having gotten a PhD.  However, I been working with some IP attorneys and have some insight from that experience.  The IP lawyers that I've worked with ended up in IP law after attending the lowest tier law schools that did not havey IP programs, the attorneys had no prior IP experience from associateships, nor do they have advanced science degrees.  All they did was get into very large firms and move into IP by simply associating with that department's attorneys at the firm.  After they got some experience (~3-5 years) they moved to new firms and established themselves as more senior IP lawyers.  Of the two I am speaking, only one had even passed the patent bar when they moved firms (the other has since passed.)  
 
If you can somehow move into IP law via the above method you should avoid the MS at all costs.  I know people who have gotten MSs at night, and it has advanced their scientific understanding some, but IMO not enough to be worth the hassle.  I think that learning on the job is just as good as getting an MS. The MS degree either does not advance your knowledge base enough or is so close to getting a PhD that you might as well do that instead.  Because the MS is so worthless in the medical sciences most people who get them now are people who have failed their PhD qualification exam (or dropped out.)  That is, most research schools have ceased offering Masters diplomas and most people who get a MS now are considered dropouts, failures, or misguided until proven otherwise.  (Sorry Masters holders, but I'm trying to be frank about it to Sparky, not offend you.)
 
FYI, if you can get an IP position without more schooling, you can get a base for anything to know about science from these two books:
1. Molecular Biology of the Cell by Alberts et al.
2. Biochemistry (can be by Voet and Voet or Stryer, whatever floats your boat.  I like V&V better, but it's not as popular as Stryer)
From these, you should just go to Pubmed!
IP Logged
PiP
Junior Member
**




   


Posts: 74
Re: Biotech - How to Start
« Reply #2 on: Jul 8th, 2005, 2:04pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Sparky, If you do get a MS or PhD--which I think is a mistake at this point in your career--definitely look at Pharmacology/Toxicology.  This is the science that matters in the biotech world and typically can give you a good overview of all science via Pharm/Tox.  Plus, people who do this research often (sadly, not in my case) have technicians who work for them.  Just a nice perk for the field!
IP Logged
Eliz
Full Member
***




   


Posts: 107
Re: Biotech - How to Start
« Reply #3 on: Jul 8th, 2005, 2:25pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Molecular Cell Biology by Lodish is also good (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?call=bv.View..ShowSection& rid=mcb)
 
Somewhat of a different style and organization than Alberts, but both give good info.  I was taught from Alberts and used Lodish when I TA'd.  Both are good, basic MCB books.  I second PiP that Stryer is very good for biochem.  I would just add that no matter which book(s) you use, be sure to get the most recent edition.  
 
I agree with PiP that you probably aren't going to be all that better off with a MS (although I am also not an attorney and just about to start law school).  From what I have heard, having the MS doesn't help much with finding a job in IP.  And you should not get a Ph.D. at this point unless you actually WANT to go to grad school.  If you are just doing it because you think it will advance your career, it will likely be a LONG road for you in grad school.  Also, after 5-7 years (or longer) in a Ph.D. program who knows how things will be in the IP field (i.e. maybe the market will be so saturated with PhDs at that point that only people who have done a postdoc or two get jobs in patent law).   Furthermore, the atmosphere in grad school can be quite hostile towards someone who is pursuing an "alternative" career, which IP law would be considered (not at all grad schools, but certainly at the big high-powered schools doing the big high-powered research).  
 
I would see where you can get with PiP's approach first.  
Good luck!
« Last Edit: Jul 8th, 2005, 2:27pm by Eliz » IP Logged
Pages: 1  Reply Reply Send Topic Send Topic Print Print

« Previous topic | Next topic »
Powered by YaBB 1 Gold - SP 1.3.2!
Forum software copyright © 2000-2004 Yet another Bulletin Board