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   Working for the USPTO
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   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 353185 times)
willi173
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Posts: 7
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #975 on: May 29th, 2007, 8:29am »
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I'm happy for all of those who have received official offers from USPTO.  However, I am quite embarrassed.  It appears that I've been rejected from joining your ranks. It's been three weeks since I received an email informing me that I was a candidate for an examiner position beginning on June 11.  I promptly forwarded official transcripts to HR as requested, and I've yet to hear anything.  With only two weeks left until that supposed start date, it looks like I'v come up short.  Oh well.
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MSU316L
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #976 on: May 29th, 2007, 8:57am »
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on May 29th, 2007, 8:29am, willi173 wrote:
I'm happy for all of those who have received official offers from USPTO.  However, I am quite embarrassed.  It appears that I've been rejected from joining your ranks. It's been three weeks since I received an email informing me that I was a candidate for an examiner position beginning on June 11.  I promptly forwarded official transcripts to HR as requested, and I've yet to hear anything.  With only two weeks left until that supposed start date, it looks like I'v come up short.  Oh well.

 
willi173,
 
I wouldn't say that is a rejection at all. Let me give you the time frame as to how things worked for me.
 
I applied for a position in late January (on USAJobs). I didn't hear back until end of Feb. saying that I was qualified - I uploaded all documents that same day.
 
I called about every 2 weeks (HR) asking the status of my application. (I mentioned I would like to have a start date of mid-May). I got my formal offer LAST WEEK! It took them a good 4 months to get in contact with me.
 
I would suggest calling around, sending your resume to those that run particular art areas that you are interested in. That is what I did and landed a spot in biotech (just where I wanted to be.) Don't give up hope.
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xexam
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #977 on: May 29th, 2007, 5:35pm »
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" I'm sure the PTO has people who try to cheat the system, as any large company does. "
 
The jury in the case cited above seemed not to think that the examiner being prosecuted was trying to cheat the system.  
 
Seriously, any place that prosecutes people who are performing well above average when they leave...  not to mention professional people... is having serious problems.
 
 
I am a former examiner and I could list both pos's and neg's about the job that would fill a book (worked there for three years).  I will say that the management often does not treat its staff as if they were professionals and that causes them to lose the best and the brightest.  They fire the worst and the middle-band they end up keeping is a hard-working lot... that also tends to be less-than-ambitious.
 
Those gigantic attrition rates are the result of two main factors:  1) management/examiner relations are quite poor when compared to other work environments and 2) after a few years on the job any examiner worth his/her salt can get a much better job in the private sector where the pay is better and the workload is about the same.
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now_at_PTO
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #978 on: May 29th, 2007, 5:41pm »
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"I've been above 100 percent since my first biweek examining and I'm averaging about 130% a biweek."
 
If this is really true than either:  1) your quality sucks and you don't understand your own art, 2) your art is super-easy (are you one of those people examining garden tools?) or 3) you went from a tenured professorship at MIT to a GS-5 step 1.
 
Seriously, production is no joke.  You're pushed by management to keep pumping out applications at the expense of your understanding them.  After you've been there for a year or so... after you become an expert in your art... this isn't a big deal.  During your first year, however, you don't know what you're doing.  If you understand that you don't know what you're doing you're fine.  If you think you know what you're doing and you don't... you're going to end up a disaster.
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mk1023
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Posts: 52
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #979 on: May 29th, 2007, 5:47pm »
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on May 29th, 2007, 8:29am, willi173 wrote:
I'm happy for all of those who have received official offers from USPTO.  However, I am quite embarrassed.  It appears that I've been rejected from joining your ranks. It's been three weeks since I received an email informing me that I was a candidate for an examiner position beginning on June 11.  I promptly forwarded official transcripts to HR as requested, and I've yet to hear anything.  With only two weeks left until that supposed start date, it looks like I'v come up short.  Oh well.

Go ahead and call them. They're VERY inefficient and sometimes don't have any idea what's going on. You can go back a few pages and read my hiring experience (reply #850). I am 100% sure I wouldn't be working at the PTO right now if I hadn't have called human resources four or five times.
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