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   Working for the USPTO
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   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 346634 times)
Axistek
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #80 on: May 2nd, 2005, 12:48pm »
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Thanks for all the info New examiner.
 
I currently have an offer to work for the USPTO, but I still have my doubts if that is what I really want to do with my life. Since I have no interest in law or intellectual property in general I'm not sure if the experience I would gain at the USPTO would help me for anything else. Any opinons? Should I take the offer or look for something else?
 
Thanks! Smiley
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Guest
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #81 on: May 2nd, 2005, 3:19pm »
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Some law firms don't even consider USPTO experience to be that valuable.  I doubt it's going to help you much, if any, in getting a job as a scientist/engineer.
 
If you aren't interested in law or intellectual property, the USPTO is probably not where you want to have your career.  Since we might be heading into another recession in a year or two, that is basically the choice you are making - whether or not you want to make a career out of the PTO.  If you don’t like the PTO and quit in a couple years, you might not be able to get another job for a while.
 
I think it's pretty rare for someone to be a PTO lifer. Usually the PTO is more of a stepping stone for those who can't get into a law firm yet, but it is an appealing career for certain types of people.  Only you know if this is the place you want to work or if you'd rather get a job in your field.
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jdhawk05
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #82 on: May 2nd, 2005, 11:06pm »
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Any examiners browsing this message board?  I'd like to hear your alls take on working at the PTO, the experience and training you felt you received, and how many attorneys work there as examiners...
 
Guest, I see many firms that require examiner experience...I find it difficult to believe that experience at the PTO is a negative, but maybe you can fill me in...
 
One other thing...anyone read USA Today today (5/2)?  There was an article about the PTO adding 900 examiner positions...any idea of how they will allocate those positions among the different technology groups?
 
 
 
 
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anon
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #83 on: May 3rd, 2005, 8:35am »
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1. Guest does not know what he is talking about. PTO experience is rarely a negative. This is true even in litigation because much of patent litigation is based on what goes on in prosecution.
 
2. I have heard that the vast majority of the new hires are for the electrial arts and computer sci. arts.
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melwrc
Junior Member
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Posts: 97
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #84 on: May 3rd, 2005, 9:34am »
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In defense of the recent guest, he said SOME firms don't consider PTO examiner experience to be that valuable, and that is true.  He did not say it was a negative.
 
Axistek said that he wasn't even sure about doing IP law at all, and was wondering if examiner experience would help in any other way (e.g. as an engineer).  And I would agree with guest that being an examiner would in no way help in general engineering or any other non-IP area.  As an examiner, you do not engineer anything.  You read big technical disclosures for form.  Time pressure keeps them from truly learning the invention, so rejections are based on quick reads through similar looking prior art.  There is no design work, testing, technical writing, or other engineering type activity as an examiner.  
If you later decide to be an engineer, working at a non-engineering job would be a negative  because you would be further removed from your school and have the same engineering experience level as a fresh graduate.  You could go for the maturity angle and at least having work experience, but gov't work is completely different from working in a corporate environment as an engineer.
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