The Intellectual Property Law Server

Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register.
Nov 18th, 2019, 7:23pm

Forums Forums Help Help Search Search Members Members Calendar Calendar Login Login Register Register
   Intellectual Property Forums
  
  
Becoming a Patent Agent/Lawyer
(Moderators: Forum Admin, JimIvey, JSonnabend)
   Working for the USPTO
« Previous topic | Next topic »
Pages: 1 ... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17  ...  252 Reply Reply Send Topic Send Topic Print Print
   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 352162 times)
p@tent.guy
Newbie
*




   


Posts: 17
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #50 on: Mar 14th, 2005, 4:48pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Negotiation authority usually comes after being a GS-13 for a year, though you have to pass the certification exam before you become a GS-13.  This new standard ends up being far more difficult than the old standard and likely exists to keep examiners in the fold. As a former examiner, I wouldn't want to leave unless you need more action at work than reviewing patent applications. I left for an IP strategy job and hated making the decision.  
 
If you wanted to work as hard as an agent while at the PTO, you could make much more than an agent. It's just that the overtime and bonuses aren't required. If you need the money, the work is there for you. If you don't, a flexible 40 hrs schedule with a good home life isn't too bad. So long as you stay on top of your production and quality, they'll give you almost all the freedom you want.  
 
Flip side of course is that if either slips, all perks go away, and stay gone for months. No OT, probably no bonus', and definitely no flex time. It's a great place to work, but, despite public opinion, they don't put up  with poor performance.  
 
If you get an offer - take it, rent at the ****n at Carlyle for a year, walk to work, get promoted at 6 months, save up for a condo, don't buy a car, join the PTOS, take the free shuttle to Old Town and the waterfront in the summers, get promoted 12 months after your 6 month promotion, buy the condo which will be built in 2008 by a metro stop but not on the green line, see if you can hit your 130% bonus, get it for the first time, dance, find a nice girl in Olson's bookstore on the waterfront, marry her, move into said condo, live happily ever after.  
 
p@tent.guy
IP Logged
Patent_Prospect
Newbie
*




   


Posts: 6
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #51 on: Mar 14th, 2005, 7:10pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Hello all,
  Sorry for the delay in responding.  I decided to take the law form job for a variety of particular reasons, mainly personal.  Law firm offered better pay, although the PTO would have matched to within 9% or so (I only qualify for a GS-11, step 10, given my particulars).  The law firm will pay for law school right out of the gate (PTO states that you must have 1 year of service, and must repay law school with time at the PTO, so four years of law school means 8 years of employment, plus 1 for a total of 9).  
   Although I am somewhat nervous about adjusting billable hour requirements, I assume that is something that I will have to face eventually, so it might as well be now than later.  Finally, I have never lived in DC, so I wanted to get the experience that could get me back to my hometown should we not like it.  I assume that my prospects are far better with law firms if I have law firm experience, in general, than with PTO experience, but only time will tell.  I hope I made the right decision, but hindsight is always 20/20.  Regardless, I am stoked to get back into the IP field.  Good luck, everyone, with all your prospects, and I'll see you on the board!
 
Patent_Prospect, Out.
IP Logged
Steve12
Newbie
*




   


Posts: 6
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #52 on: Apr 11th, 2005, 10:54am »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

How often to the training classes for new examiners start. Is there a new one every month.
 
IP Logged
jeb
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #53 on: Apr 11th, 2005, 11:53am »
Quote Quote Modify Modify Remove Remove

It  depends on when the hiring needs are filled. They may go for 6 months or more without starting a new initial training session and then start several initial training classes back to back.  
 
Typically when congress releases the USPTO budget they can hire a certain number of new examiners. Each tech center hires the number they are allotted and when they reach a specific class size of 15 or so then they schedule the initial training.  
 
Also, the training for biotech/chem, electrical etc. is unique to those arts so the training for the different technologies occurs at different times depending on where you work.
 
I hope this is helpful.
IP Logged
Access Patent Group (APG)
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #54 on: Apr 12th, 2005, 8:26pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify Remove Remove

hi!  
 
EE is always hot in USPTO. You must have PhD. in order to be hired as Biotech Examiner.
 
 
sincerely,  
   
Thien Tran  
MSEE - Registered Patent Agent #47,351  
http://www.accesspatentgroup.com
IP Logged
Pages: 1 ... 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17  ...  252 Reply Reply Send Topic Send Topic Print Print

« Previous topic | Next topic »
Powered by YaBB 1 Gold - SP 1.3.2!
Forum software copyright 2000-2004 Yet another Bulletin Board