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   Working for the USPTO
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   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 343190 times)
daven
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Posts: 75
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #45 on: Feb 26th, 2005, 4:02pm »
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Steve12,
Yes, I'm interested!  I haven't decided if I want to live near D.C.  I saw a show recently on "sluggers", people who hitchhike to work in Alexandria due to the terrible traffic.  People pick them up so they'll have enough people in the car to legally drive in the express lanes.  I think I saw it on CNN or MSNBC.
 
I would love to work at the USPTO but don't want to develop heart problems just getting to workSmiley  Is it really that bad up there?
thanks
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Steve12
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Posts: 6
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #46 on: Mar 1st, 2005, 5:43am »
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I went to the TC 1600 job fair / interview last week, and I was very impressed with the people there.  Very straight forward discussion of what it is like to work in the office.
 
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fredzy
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #47 on: Mar 14th, 2005, 11:46am »
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I just received a job offer from the USPTO. As far as the step scale is concerned, they told me that the "regulation" is that they will match your current salary, another offer, or if you offer a "rare" skill they may increase the step you start at. I have a Ph.D. in biochemistry. So, apparently post-doctoral experience and/or a low paying job (like my current one) will NOT help you start higher. (Keep this in mind, those of you about to graduate)  
 
I read elsewhere on the forum that if one works at USPTO for five years, you are automatically accepted to prosecute before the office. In other words, you do not need to pass the patent bar. Is this true ?
 
Also, what happened to patent_prospect: Did s/he decide on USPTO or the law firm ?
 
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Jonathan
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Posts: 611
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #48 on: Mar 14th, 2005, 12:53pm »
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Fredzy wrote: "I read elsewhere on the forum that if one works at USPTO for five years, you are automatically accepted to prosecute before the office. In other words, you do not need to pass the patent bar. Is this true ?"
 
The correct figure is four years and only applies to Examiners that completed their four years of service by July 26, 2004, was an examiner at the time of departure from the office, had successful performance reviews for at least the last two fiscal years of their employment period and was not under any oral or written warnings regarding their performance at the time of their departure from the patent office.
 
For all other Examiners that had not completed 4 years of service by July 26, 2004 or were hired after July 26, 2004: be an Examiner at the time of your departure from the patent office, receive a certificate of legal competency and negotiation authority, after receiving the certificate -  have successful performance reviews for at least the last two fiscal  years of their employment period and was not under any oral or written warnings regarding their performance at the time of their departure from the patent office.
 
So, newer Examiners still have be an Examiner for at least two years after receiving the certificate but I don't know how long it takes to get that certificate.
 
Refer to 37 C.F.R. 11.7 (d) for all the details.
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Jonathan
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Posts: 611
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #49 on: Mar 14th, 2005, 12:58pm »
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Additionally, the former Examiner needs to meet the same technical qualifications as non-examiners applying to take the patent bar exam.  
 
Oddly enough, I suppose this means that a person with a scientific degree can be hired as an Examiner yet still not qualify to sit for the patent bar exam if they had to apply under something other than category A but did not have all the required coursework under their belt.
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