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Becoming a Patent Agent/Lawyer
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   Working for the USPTO
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   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 343177 times)
mithong
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Posts: 11
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #375 on: Jun 2nd, 2006, 1:54pm »
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on Jun 2nd, 2006, 1:51pm, Guest wrote:
If you want to get a flavor for what you do every day, most patent applications are published, and most of the rejections are based on other patents or published applications.
 
You can go here, and find what classes your Art Unit covers (note: some Art Units don't work on all the subclasses of a particular class):
 
http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/opc/caau.htm
 
Then you can go here:
 
http://www.uspto.gov/go/classification/selectnumwithtitle.htm
 
Find your class and click "go", there you see all the subclasses you are working on.
 
Choose a class and subclass, and go here:
 
http://appft1.uspto.gov/netahtml/PTO/search-bool.html
 
and search for applications with the same "Current US Classification" with your search term in the format of class/subclass.
 
There is a chance that you could see some of the exact cases you will be examining.
 
Click on one of them, and look at the claims.
 
Your job will be to find every detail in all of the claims in another patent or published application.  Then you will write an essay ("office action") explaining exactly how what is in the patent you found matches the claims and identifying the details by figure number, reference number or column and line number.
 
A lot of examiners simply copy the claims directly and insert the numbers in parenthesis next to the detail.
 
For example:
 
Let's say your case has this for the claims:
 
What is claimed is:  
 
1.  A vehicle comprising a steering wheel and a seat.
 
You found a patent by an inventor named Smith that has 3 figures - Fig.1 shows a car; Fig 2. shows the steering wheel of the car; Fig.3 shows a seat of the car.
 
You would write:
 
Smith discloses a vehicle (Fig. 1) comprising a steering wheel (Fig. 2) and a seat (Fig. 3).
 
That is it, except your "office action" will be littered with a bunch of form paragraphs from the MPEP, such as these:
 
http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/mpep/documents/0700_706_02_i.htm
 
Techincally, if your case is published, you could probably do most of an "office action" with the MPEP and the USPTO search website:
 
http://www.uspto.gov/patft/index.html
 
You can kind of get a feel for it with that, but it's a lot easier to do it at the PTO because they give you better search tools, and they have a Microsoft Word macro that makes it easier to add all the form paragraphs.  Plus there are other papers you need to fill out.
 
But that is pretty much what you do all day every day.  The only thing that changes is that you need to do progressively more and more in a 2 week period.
 
Your only break is if somehow you can finagle a way to get "other time", which is time where you don't have to work on a case.

 
so how much of the whole patent examining process is technical knowledge, and how much is just knowing how the patent process works?
 
i've heard from some that having great tech knowledge on ur art unit is IMPORTANT, but others have told me that it's not as crucial
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Guest
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #376 on: Jun 2nd, 2006, 2:41pm »
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on Jun 2nd, 2006, 1:54pm, mithong wrote:

 
so how much of the whole patent examining process is technical knowledge, and how much is just knowing how the patent process works?
 
i've heard from some that having great tech knowledge on ur art unit is IMPORTANT, but others have told me that it's not as crucial

 
 
Most of the job is searching through patents to find features from the claims.  If you can understand the patents and the claims well enough to do that, you are set.
 
The legal apsect is almost secondary.
IP Logged
schedule
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #377 on: Jun 2nd, 2006, 3:10pm »
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did you get ur offer through the job fair? did they give it to you on the spot?
 
he said he would get back to me within a month
 
 
I was told how much money I would make given my
gpa at the job fair, but no job offer  on the spot.  I sent in my resume and transcript
after a certain period of time, and got an interview.
 Then I heard back from
HR quickly after I did my jars and security forms.
I think if you have a high gpa in the right major, and do well in your interview you
should get hired!    
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mithong
Newbie
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Posts: 11
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #378 on: Jun 2nd, 2006, 3:18pm »
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on Jun 2nd, 2006, 3:10pm, schedule wrote:
did you get ur offer through the job fair? did they give it to you on the spot?
 
he said he would get back to me within a month
 
 
I was told how much money I would make given my
gpa at the job fair, but no job offer  on the spot.  I sent in my resume and transcript
after a certain period of time, and got an interview.
 Then I heard back from
HR quickly after I did my jars and security forms.
I think if you have a high gpa in the right major, and do well in your interview you
should get hired!    

 
so you had an interview at the job fair, sent in ur resume and then had another interview?
 
what was that "certain period of time"
?
IP Logged
schedule
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #379 on: Jun 2nd, 2006, 3:32pm »
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so you had an interview at the job fair, sent in ur resume and then had another interview?
 
what was that "certain period of time"
?  
 
I don't want to identify myself by giving out specifics.
If I were you though, I would study before going
into ANY interview for your major.  That is more important
right now for you.   If you don't hear from them after a while though, you
might want to call them up to ask if they still have
your resume on file.   Lips Sealed If your school has mock
interview practice, I would go to those, so you
get better at interviewing.  I learned alot from mock
interviews with real employers.
IP Logged
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