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   Working for the USPTO
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   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 342805 times)
shedule
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #370 on: Jun 2nd, 2006, 11:15am »
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I got an offer too.  I think the money is great!
I only have a B.S. but have good grades.  I am very
excited about this job and can hardly wait to start!
I am not really deterred by what has been posted
on this forum, because I have heard worse stories
in the private sector.  I just hope the benefits of
this job don't dwindle down to what is being offered
in the private sector--some people have to choose
between vacation time and sick leave, you only
get 10 days of them combined.
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DeepBlue
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #371 on: Jun 2nd, 2006, 12:18pm »
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Can someone recently hired in TC1600 please share with us their experience and, if possible the number of positions will be filling next year for Biotech/Organic Chem/Phamaceutics? Thanks.
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mithong
Newbie
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Posts: 11
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #372 on: Jun 2nd, 2006, 12:38pm »
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on Jun 2nd, 2006, 11:01am, SICKOFITALL wrote:
Just went there and got offer but refused it. Money is horrible. In some groups you need a PhD to get in. Also your work is only what examiners do NOT what an attorney would be does so minimal law and lots of reviewing science papers against patent claims.

 
you were at the job fair and they offered you a job on the spot after your interview?
 
my guy told me they would get back to me within a month.  i guess thats not good for meSad
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mithong
Newbie
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Posts: 11
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #373 on: Jun 2nd, 2006, 12:39pm »
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on Jun 2nd, 2006, 11:15am, shedule wrote:
I got an offer too.  I think the money is great!
I only have a B.S. but have good grades.  I am very
excited about this job and can hardly wait to start!
I am not really deterred by what has been posted
on this forum, because I have heard worse stories
in the private sector.  I just hope the benefits of
this job don't dwindle down to what is being offered
in the private sector--some people have to choose
between vacation time and sick leave, you only
get 10 days of them combined.

 
did you get ur offer through the job fair? did they give it to you on the spot?
 
he said he would get back to me within a month Sad
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Guest
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #374 on: Jun 2nd, 2006, 1:51pm »
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If you want to get a flavor for what you do every day, most patent applications are published, and most of the rejections are based on other patents or published applications.
 
You can go here, and find what classes your Art Unit covers (note: some Art Units don't work on all the subclasses of a particular class):
 
http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/opc/caau.htm
 
Then you can go here:
 
http://www.uspto.gov/go/classification/selectnumwithtitle.htm
 
Find your class and click "go", there you see all the subclasses you are working on.
 
Choose a class and subclass, and go here:
 
http://appft1.uspto.gov/netahtml/PTO/search-bool.html
 
and search for applications with the same "Current US Classification" with your search term in the format of class/subclass.
 
There is a chance that you could see some of the exact cases you will be examining.
 
Click on one of them, and look at the claims.
 
Your job will be to find every detail in all of the claims in another patent or published application.  Then you will write an essay ("office action") explaining exactly how what is in the patent you found matches the claims and identifying the details by figure number, reference number or column and line number.
 
A lot of examiners simply copy the claims directly and insert the numbers in parenthesis next to the detail.
 
For example:
 
Let's say your case has this for the claims:
 
What is claimed is:  
 
1.  A vehicle comprising a steering wheel and a seat.
 
You found a patent by an inventor named Smith that has 3 figures - Fig.1 shows a car; Fig 2. shows the steering wheel of the car; Fig.3 shows a seat of the car.
 
You would write:
 
Smith discloses a vehicle (Fig. 1) comprising a steering wheel (Fig. 2) and a seat (Fig. 3).
 
That is it, except your "office action" will be littered with a bunch of form paragraphs from the MPEP, such as these:
 
http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/mpep/documents/0700_706_02_i.htm
 
Techincally, if your case is published, you could probably do most of an "office action" with the MPEP and the USPTO search website:
 
http://www.uspto.gov/patft/index.html
 
You can kind of get a feel for it with that, but it's a lot easier to do it at the PTO because they give you better search tools, and they have a Microsoft Word macro that makes it easier to add all the form paragraphs.  Plus there are other papers you need to fill out.
 
But that is pretty much what you do all day every day.  The only thing that changes is that you need to do progressively more and more in a 2 week period.
 
Your only break is if somehow you can finagle a way to get "other time", which is time where you don't have to work on a case.
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