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   Working for the USPTO
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   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 348153 times)
eliza
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Posts: 4
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #355 on: May 26th, 2006, 7:55pm »
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Based on the discussions here, it seems like after you've been at the PTO for awhile the only job choices you have are to either stay at the PTO or work at a law firm.  Basically, you'll be stuck in a patent law career as opposed to an engineering career.
 
Also, it seems like there are examiners with law degrees at the PTO who DON'T want to work at a law firm and feel that the PTO is their only alternative.  
 
What do you think? Is the PTO still better than working at a law firm?
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guest
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #356 on: May 26th, 2006, 8:51pm »
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on May 26th, 2006, 5:47pm, guest wrote:
Roll Eyes Just out of curiosity , what sort of mechanisms is PTO using for a job assignment? An application can come with less than 20 claims to god knows how many. I assume it counts the same amount of work when it is done, isnt it? Any chance that this is done unfairly to junior guys?

 
Luck of the draw. The new guys coming out of training will probably get a couple rounds of easy cases on their dockets but then they join the normal rotation very quickly. But the number of claims is not always a good indicator of the difficulty of the case. Not going into it any further though. Don't worry about the job until you get there. Take more important information from this board instead of little detailed questions like everyone is asking.
 
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guest
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #357 on: May 26th, 2006, 9:01pm »
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on May 26th, 2006, 7:55pm, eliza wrote:
Based on the discussions here, it seems like after you've been at the PTO for awhile the only job choices you have are to either stay at the PTO or work at a law firm.  Basically, you'll be stuck in a patent law career as opposed to an engineering career.
 
Also, it seems like there are examiners with law degrees at the PTO who DON'T want to work at a law firm and feel that the PTO is their only alternative.  
 
What do you think? Is the PTO still better than working at a law firm?

 
 
Not many options. The rush into this field will likely make the jobs much harder to find for patent lawyers a few years down the road. The number of people at the PTO who want to go to law school is huge, probably because the only other option is to go to law school (besides being an agent or searcher and i know people who have gone that route). There will always be jobs but the competition will just get much more fierce, imo.
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shedule1
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #358 on: May 27th, 2006, 4:10pm »
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I've already signed my agreement, but still want
to keep my options open for the future, so I just
told the other job that I couldn't accept it at this
time.   Wouldn't you say that programming for
the military would be a harder job than patent
examiner?  Also I have had to work double shifts
until 2am at other jobs and work 6 days a week.  Have you had to do this
as a patent examiner?
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guest
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #359 on: May 29th, 2006, 12:16pm »
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You are only required to work until your production is at or above 95% (its a little different for probationary people, but its still production based). If you're working overtime and not billing them for it beyond that then you're just giving them production for free.
 
If you want to make your promotion you have to be halfway between your current production level and the next production level, which is 15% higher.  
 
Basically you can count on working some unpaid overtime, although its not allowed for those under gs-9. Officially....
 
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