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   Working for the USPTO
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   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 342851 times)
Sheetal Rangrej
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #315 on: May 13th, 2006, 11:18am »
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It took 3 weeks for me.
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nerdy
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #316 on: May 14th, 2006, 1:29pm »
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Thanks for your reply, Sheetal.  Does anyone know
how hard it is to actually get compensatory time
if you are constantly under pressure to meet
production?  Or are you better off taking the
guaranteed overtime pay?  Can you switch later
after finding out you really don't have the time
to take the compensatory time?  I think I am
interested in the compensatory time, but from what
I've heard around my neighborhood, they keep
you pretty busy there, so perhaps I might never get to take it if that's how it is.  I heard about one person
who had to quit because I guess he wasn't fast
enough.  The person I spoke to said he wasn't given the
time to "do the job properly".  Also, what is the
most important indicator for success at the
PTO?  Is it reading speed?  How many pages of technical material
per hour do the successful ptoers read?  
Also is it looked down upon if you decide to use
the gym for half an hour during your lunch break,
and then 15 minutes to eat?  
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Isaac
Senior Member
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Posts: 3472
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #317 on: May 14th, 2006, 1:53pm »
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on May 14th, 2006, 1:29pm, nerdy wrote:
The person I spoke to said he wasn't given the time to "do the job properly".

 
The nature of any job involving searching through literature is that you can do a better job given more time.   Examiner's are not expected to do a perfect search, so your friend's comment begs the question of whether he was unable to do the expected job in the amount of time given, or whether he set too a high a standard and was unable to let go and move on to the next job at the expected time.
 
 
Quote:

Also is it looked down upon if you decide to use
the gym for half an hour during your lunch break,
and then 15 minutes to eat?

 
You are not watched quite so closely as this.  If you are not taking long lunches you won't have a problem.
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Isaac
nerdy
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #318 on: May 15th, 2006, 3:32pm »
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Thanks for your reply, Isaac.  I am still curious as
to how I would compare with someone who is
working in the patent office who doesn't need overtime
in order to meet production:  I strongly suspect reading
speed is a strong indicator for success (correct me
if I am wrong, besides technical knowledge),  and
I have timed myself reading up to 50 pages per
hour of technical material while typing notes.  Other
times I am alot slower than this.  Do you think this
is faster or slower than the successful patent examiners,
and how fast would you say you would have to read in order
to process patents in a timely (and non-overtime) manner?
I have other job offers and am trying to make my
decision based on something more than money--success
and happiness with the job.
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Isaac
Senior Member
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Posts: 3472
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #319 on: May 15th, 2006, 3:56pm »
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on May 15th, 2006, 3:32pm, nerdy wrote:
Thanks for your reply, Isaac. I am still curious as
to how I would compare with someone who is
working in the patent office who doesn't need overtime
in order to meet production: I strongly suspect reading
speed is a strong indicator for success (correct me
if I am wrong, besides technical knowledge), and
I have timed myself reading up to 50 pages per
hour of technical material while typing notes.

 
I don't believe that high reading speed is a predictor of success.   Searching involves coming up with a good search strategy that includes the relevant material in as small a haystack as practical.  Trying to brute force speed read through a lot of stuff to find a reference in a huge pile is not going to be a successful strategy very often.  There is some amount of grinding through of course, but the more of that you have to do, the more inefficient you will be.
 
Just my take on things.  I was a fairly average examiner.
 
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Isaac
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