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   Working for the USPTO
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   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 342795 times)
Isaac
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #200 on: Dec 30th, 2005, 6:54am »
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If you are the kind of workaholic that you say you are, then how are you planning to deal with signing a statement every pay period indicating that you are not working unpaid overtime?  
 
You submit a time card every two weeks documenting your hours worked, and the hours that are "other time" and are not to be charged.  Other time includes official training, holidays, as well as a few work related activities.   That report is used to calculate production and not the time you are clocked into the building.
 
I don't work at the PTO anymore.  I'm not aware of anyone being busted for working too many hours during the time I was there.  I am aware of people being busted for various schemes to work less than 40 hours, so I'm sure your time in the building is monitored.
 
I`
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Isaac
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #201 on: Dec 30th, 2005, 8:03pm »
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Thanks for all the info.  Hopefully, I will have an official offer soon.
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Isaac
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Posts: 3472
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #202 on: Dec 31st, 2005, 8:33am »
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Some times the person who sends out the offers gets swamped, goes on vacation, etc.  I would follow up with the SPE after a week or so.  I vaguely remember something like that happening with me.
 
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Isaac
Wiscagent
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #203 on: Dec 31st, 2005, 12:08pm »
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A couple of recent posts included this exchange:
- - - - - - - - - - - - - -  
 …  If it takes an extra hour to finish something  
 before I go home, then that's what I do.  Are you  
 saying that if I spend 4 hrs doing something that is  
 suppose to take 3, it will lower my production even  
 if I don't ask to get paid for the extra hour?
 
 If the government wants the patents reviewed, they  
 should have a  system where you are asked to work  
 40 hours and maintain 100% production to be in  
 good standing.  Then award overtime based on any  
 production over 100%.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - -  
 I don't work at the PTO anymore.  I'm not aware  
 of anyone being busted for working too many  
 hours during the time I was there.  I am aware  
 of people being busted for various schemes to  
 work less than 40 hours, so I'm sure your time  
 in the building is monitored.
- - - - - - - - - - - - - -  
My son who works in the post office, i.e. the USPS not the USPTO, recently told me of a situation that may relate to the prohibition on unpaid overtime for examiners.  
 
One of the new carriers in his post office is unable to reliably finish his route on time.  He has been filling out his time sheet as though he was finishing on time.  Obviously, his motivation is that he wants to keep the job, even if he has to put in some unpaid o.t.  On the surface it would appear that no one loses.  The carrier is willing to put in the extra hours for no pay, and the postal patrons get their mail (albeit a bit late).
 
In actuality, however the carrier can be harming his co-workers.
 
Each year the postmaster conducts a study to determine how long it takes to finish a route.  The time required for the route changes with the number of houses or apartments or businesses, traffic conditions, etc.  Ideally, each carrier would have the same work load assigned; and that work load would be accomplished in 8 hours by a competent carrier under normal conditions.  Based on the time cards, and other information, the postmaster modifies or adds routes as needed.
 
So the postal carrier that is working unpaid o.t. actually is distorting the data that the postmaster needs to uniformly assign routes.  The next carrier on that route either would receive poor performance results or have to work unpaid o.t.
 
I think the parallel to the examiner’s role at the USPTO is clear.  Even if a particular examiner is willing to put in unpaid o.t., he is indirectly harming his co-workers.
 
 - Rich
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Richard Tanzer
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Isaac
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Posts: 3472
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #204 on: Dec 31st, 2005, 8:02pm »
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For examiners, there really is no issue with hurting other examiners by doing unpaid overtime.
The work requirements are based on studies done almost 30 years ago with some minor tweaks.  They are not periodically re-evaluated.
Besides that, the PTO has no problem with examiners at GS-9 and above working unpaid overtime.
 
The PTO wants to avoid a situation where a non exempt employee sues the PTO for assigning him a production goal that forces the employee to work overtime without pay.
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Isaac
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