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   Working for the USPTO
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   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 352082 times)
alfredhorg
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #185 on: Oct 17th, 2005, 11:55am »
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on Oct 15th, 2005, 6:11pm, techietoo wrote:

 
I work at the PTO and they are hiring like crazy. Are you interested in starting as an examiner or an attorney? I assume you have a science undergrad if you want to be an examiner, but they hire attorneys without a science undergrad to do Trademark stuff. I've met a couple of them there.
 
My experience is that you just have to put in your time to move up; there really is no limit as an examiner. Don't know much about the JD side.
 
I'm starting law school next year, part-time of course.  
 

 
I can't believe it!  Somebody replied to me.
 
I would like to start as an examiner so that I can get the examination experience that would make me eligible to become a USPTO patent attorney.
 
Good luck with law school, techietoo.  I have been wondering these days if I should have started first as an examiner, then gotten the USPTO to pay my law school tuition.  If only I had known in 2003 that the USPTO itself employs the patent attorneys it oversees, I would have gone into examination before law school.
 
If you happen to need one more person to give you advice about law school, I would be happy to give advice just for the possibility of getting more advice about employment at the USPTO.
 
My email address is: alfredhorg@comcast.net
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HerculePoirot
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #186 on: Oct 17th, 2005, 9:13pm »
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Alfredhorg,
    Responding to your question about becoming an Administrative Patent Judge, you will need your law degree, membership in some state bar, and experience equivalent to being a primary examiner to apply.  After that, I don't know the criteria they use for selection (other than the KSAs posted for the job on the web).
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alfredhorg
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #187 on: Oct 18th, 2005, 4:24pm »
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on Oct 17th, 2005, 9:13pm, HerculePoirot wrote:
Alfredhorg,
    Responding to your question about becoming an Administrative Patent Judge, you will need your law degree, membership in some state bar, and experience equivalent to being a primary examiner to apply.  After that, I don't know the criteria they use for selection (other than the KSAs posted for the job on the web).  

 
Hmmmm.  Becoming an Administrative Patent Judge does not sound like it requires an act of God.  I like the idea that I could become one after years of not backbreaking toil, but steadily competent job performance.
 
Thanks for the insight.
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techietoo
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #188 on: Oct 18th, 2005, 7:11pm »
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alfredhorg, i sent you an email.
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herculepoirot
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #189 on: Oct 19th, 2005, 8:17pm »
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on Oct 12th, 2005, 11:47pm, NoVA Guest wrote:
Hi all,  
This may have been asked before, so please bear with me..
 
I've been told by some that in order to work for TC1600 (Biotech) one must possess a Ph.D. or have a tremendous amount of work experience under their belt.  
At the same time, there have been some who have told me that the turnover rate at the patent office is so high that they are in desperate need of people. I'm not really sure what to believe.  
I applied with the patent office in late Feb.2005 while still in school and never heard anything. I completed school this May with a Masters degree in Biochemistry & Mol. Biology and have no relevant significant work experience.  Would it be advisable to re-submit an application?
And does anyone know how long it typically takes to process an application?  
Thanks  
  

 
 
NOVAguest,
     I think it would be quite advisable to resubmit your application to TC1600.  That TC will be hiring about 100 people (probably) over the coming year.  While many of the examiners have Ph.D.s, there is a healthy leavening of masters and bachelors degrees mixed in.  You might focus on certain areas where there are less Ph.D.s, like the 1650s.  I would also recommend that you directly contact several of the supervisors (termed SPEs) in specific art units in which you are interested.  Assuming you can write and speak English well, you are likely to make a favorable impression which may motivate them to be interested in you.
 
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