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   Working for the USPTO
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   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 349884 times)
eric stasik
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #15 on: Feb 2nd, 2005, 7:11am »
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on Feb 2nd, 2005, 3:55am, Anon wrote:
Although there is no shortage of new applicants, the PTO has a problem retaining experienced Examiners.  Once examiners get their training, they often leave for higher paying (or equally paying, but less stressful) jobs.

 
looking at the USPTO as a public agency i actually don't see this as negative. the infusion of former USPTO examiners into the pool of agents and attorneys keeps professional standards high in the private sector. of course it presents a difficulty for the USPTO as an employer, but i see their role of trainer/educator as equally important.  
 
that being said, a core of long term competent employees is crucial to ANY organisation so the USPTO has to balance the turnover with a policy to provide truly competitive options for those who make a career of it.  
 
/eric stasik
 
 
 
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JB
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #16 on: Feb 2nd, 2005, 7:27am »
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If you want to apply Pat Grant's logic as a quick and imprecise exercise one could easily compare the hiring at the USPTO to any firm's hiring practices.  
 
For example say that a 100 lawyer firm hires 10 new associates each year or roughly 10%. Compared to the USPTO that means hiring 10% of 3,900 exminers each year (390 positions). Of course they would constantly be hiring to get the most qualified candidates. Even if they were hiring 100 or 200 examiners they would be consistently listing openings.  
 
Pat Grant seems to have no clue and poor off-the-cuff logic. THINK before you speak.
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Anon
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #17 on: Feb 2nd, 2005, 8:02am »
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on Feb 2nd, 2005, 7:11am, eric stasik wrote:

looking at the USPTO as a public agency i actually don't see this as negative. the infusion of former USPTO examiners into the pool of agents and attorneys keeps professional standards high in the private sector. of course it presents a difficulty for the USPTO as an employer, but i see their role of trainer/educator as equally important.  

 
I agree (and I think that even the PTO would agree) that their role is, in part, that of a trainer/educator.  Even so, the turnover at the PTO has reached a point that is unhealthy.  My stats are a little out of date, but last I heard, 50% of examiners had been with the office for fewer than 3 years, which coincidentally is just about how long it takes most examiners to attain a reasonable level of competence.
 
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Pat Grant
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #18 on: Feb 2nd, 2005, 9:10am »
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on Feb 2nd, 2005, 7:27am, JB wrote:
If you want to apply Pat Grant's logic as a quick and imprecise exercise one could easily compare the hiring at the USPTO to any firm's hiring practices.  
 
For example say that a 100 lawyer firm hires 10 new associates each year or roughly 10%. Compared to the USPTO that means hiring 10% of 3,900 exminers each year (390 positions). Of course they would constantly be hiring to get the most qualified candidates. Even if they were hiring 100 or 200 examiners they would be consistently listing openings.  
 
Pat Grant seems to have no clue and poor off-the-cuff logic. THINK before you speak.

 
Ummmmmmmmmm...Nice to meet you, too? Grin
 
Wow!  Post an opinion, get insulted. Roll Eyes
 
Well,  I respect yours and others opinions.  I believe smart people can disagree, no insults required. Wink
 
My comments are simply an personal based on my personal experience.  Obviously you and others have had different experiences.  Hearing about them has been enlightening.    
 
I'm sure there are some niche areas, like biotech, where it's more competitive.  However, I wouldn't want to post an opinion based solely on those cases and needlessly scare someone away from seeking employment.
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Pat Grant
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #19 on: Feb 2nd, 2005, 9:14am »
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on Feb 2nd, 2005, 9:10am, Pat Grant wrote:

 
My comments are simply an personal based on my personal experience.  

 
oops - should read "My comments are simply a personal opinion based on my personal experience."
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