The Intellectual Property Law Server

Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register.
May 24th, 2019, 10:35pm

Forums Forums Help Help Search Search Members Members Calendar Calendar Login Login Register Register
   Intellectual Property Forums
  
  
Becoming a Patent Agent/Lawyer
(Moderators: Forum Admin, JimIvey, JSonnabend)
   Working for the USPTO
« Previous topic | Next topic »
Pages: 1 ... 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252  Reply Reply Send Topic Send Topic Print Print
   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 343033 times)
mk1023
Junior Member
**




   


Posts: 52
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1240 on: Nov 14th, 2007, 8:49pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Check out: http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/dcom/olia/aipa/102eflowchart.pdf
 
Priority date=filing date to which priority can be claimed
 
These examples should clarify things somewhat.
Let's suppose today is 1/1/2010 and you're examining the application
Your application: Filed 1/1/2007 published 1/1/2009
Reference A: Filed 12/29/2006 published 12/29/2008
Reference B: Filed 1/2/2007 published 1/2/2009 but is a continuation of an application filed 1/1/1997.
Reference C: Filed 1/10/2007 published 1/10/2009 claiming priority to a Japanese PCT filed 1/10/2004 published in Japanese
Reference D: Filed 1/1/2003 published 1/1/2005 no priority claims
Reference E: Filed 1/1/2005 published 6/1/2006 no priority claims
 
Reference A: Priority date is 12/29/2006-make a 102e rejection
Reference B: Priority date is 1/1/1997 (can use) make a 102e rejection (although you should pull up the priority document and use it as a 102b)
Reference C: Priority date is 1/10/2007 (can't use for any kind of rejection)  
Reference D: Priority date is 1/1/2005 which definitely beats your application so you could make a 102e rejection, however the publication date is more than a year before the filing date so you should make the 102b rejection since that's a statutory bar.
Reference E: Priority date is 1/1/2005. Although the application was filed more than one year before your application, the filing date was not. You should only make a 102e rejection.
IP Logged
gtg787t
Newbie
*




   


Posts: 3
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1241 on: Nov 15th, 2007, 7:44am »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Hi all,  
 
   I recently passed the patent bar and sent of my registration fee of $100 this past week.  I was just wondering what the next step is?  Do they send you a certificate of registration stating that you are a patent agent or how does that work out?
 
Thanks in advance,
 
B.
IP Logged
Eric Nallon
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1242 on: Nov 27th, 2007, 1:09pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify Remove Remove

I will be graduating in Dec. with a BSEE and currently have an offer from the USPTO as an examiner.  I am concerned I will not like the type of work due to my background.  I have always been a technical hands-on person with interests in design.  Anyone have any input for me?
IP Logged
guests101
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1243 on: Nov 28th, 2007, 8:40pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify Remove Remove

on Nov 27th, 2007, 1:09pm, Eric Nallon wrote:
I will be graduating in Dec. with a BSEE and currently have an offer from the USPTO as an examiner.  I am concerned I will not like the type of work due to my background.  I have always been a technical hands-on person with interests in design.  Anyone have any input for me?

 
If you want to do hands-on technical stuff then the patent office is NOT a good choice. The skills you have now will "depreciate" over time at the patent office until eventually your only career paths will be either patent examiner or patent agent/lawyer. Take this from a current examiner like myself.
 
IP Logged
guest102
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1244 on: Nov 29th, 2007, 10:15pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify Remove Remove

on Nov 27th, 2007, 1:09pm, Eric Nallon wrote:
I will be graduating in Dec. with a BSEE and currently have an offer from the USPTO as an examiner.  I am concerned I will not like the type of work due to my background.  I have always been a technical hands-on person with interests in design.  Anyone have any input for me?

 
Patent Examiners are constantly and literally forever working under a "production" clock. To many previous as well as current examiners, the production expectancy quota is unrealistic and outdated. The Office takes this production expectancy very seriously; numerous past examiners were let go though they were perceived to have left on their own, due to failure to meet such expectation. Read the latest GAO report on USPTO (google for it). It should give you a view of the examiner job different from what your interviewers had told you.
 
Other than that, it is a wonderful job.
IP Logged
Pages: 1 ... 243 244 245 246 247 248 249 250 251 252  Reply Reply Send Topic Send Topic Print Print

« Previous topic | Next topic »
Powered by YaBB 1 Gold - SP 1.3.2!
Forum software copyright © 2000-2004 Yet another Bulletin Board