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   Working for the USPTO
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   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 348299 times)
Anon Examiner
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1100 on: Jul 8th, 2007, 8:06am »
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on Jul 7th, 2007, 11:51pm, Tiger4852 wrote:
Thank you everyone for your input. Lots of good information!
 
If it is true that one cannot get out of paying taxes on law school tuition (without grossing up income), then it seems that working at the PTO for at least four years without leaving for a law firm would have its advantages. The pay would be decent, especially if I agreed to the service agreement to get the EE/CE recruitment incentive bonus. Also, it seems that one could not find a better job to work while going to school than at the PTO due to some of the government benefits, and especially the flex work schedule. Maybe some of you have opinions on this.  
 
I would likely start law school paying out of pocket immediately in the first Fall working at the PTO if everything works out. Then the PTO would only pay for my final two years of tuition, and it seems I would owe them only about 1 year of service after I graduate if they paid for credits just over those two years.
 
As long as you are all being so helpful, I'd also like to ask a couple more things Smiley
 
-When can I begin to apply to the USPTO? Whenever I contact them via e-mail, they just refer me to their website. I graduate in May 2008. I've heard that I may not be able to apply until October when the government's new fiscal year budget is set??
 
-If I went through with all of this, when would be the best time to take the patent bar exam?
 
Thanks everyone, I appreciate it!

 
I'm not familiar with the current recruiting process, but I can address your second question.  If you work for the PTO for 4 years and pass the certification exam then you can get the patent bar waived.
IP Logged
Anon Examiner
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1101 on: Jul 8th, 2007, 8:08am »
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on Jul 7th, 2007, 11:51pm, Tiger4852 wrote:
Thank you everyone for your input. Lots of good information!
 
If it is true that one cannot get out of paying taxes on law school tuition (without grossing up income), then it seems that working at the PTO for at least four years without leaving for a law firm would have its advantages. The pay would be decent, especially if I agreed to the service agreement to get the EE/CE recruitment incentive bonus. Also, it seems that one could not find a better job to work while going to school than at the PTO due to some of the government benefits, and especially the flex work schedule. Maybe some of you have opinions on this.  
 
I would likely start law school paying out of pocket immediately in the first Fall working at the PTO if everything works out. Then the PTO would only pay for my final two years of tuition, and it seems I would owe them only about 1 year of service after I graduate if they paid for credits just over those two years.
 
As long as you are all being so helpful, I'd also like to ask a couple more things Smiley
 
-When can I begin to apply to the USPTO? Whenever I contact them via e-mail, they just refer me to their website. I graduate in May 2008. I've heard that I may not be able to apply until October when the government's new fiscal year budget is set??
 
-If I went through with all of this, when would be the best time to take the patent bar exam?
 
Thanks everyone, I appreciate it!

 
I'm not familiar with the current recruiting process, but I can address your second question.  If you work for the PTO for 4 years and pass the certification exam then you can get the patent bar waived.
IP Logged
blackcat
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1102 on: Jul 8th, 2007, 9:32pm »
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Hi all, I applied to the biotechnology art unit back in June 2007 via USAjobs, and HR sent me an email saying that I am qualified for the position and the grade level (GS-9).  I then contacted one of the hiring managers and he told me that currently biotechnology unit is not hiring in this fiscal year.   I just wrote to another hiring manager requesting an information interview.  
 
I have also been applying to technology specialist positions in law firms.  My strategy is that I want to get my feet wet in the IP field while keep on applying to PTO.  I actually wouldn't mind starting out in a law firm and to see if I want to stay on, but my husband and I want to start family planning next year and I want to have the flex time and day care options.  
 
What do you think of my approach, and can you advise me on how to proceed from here, given my situation?  
 
Thanks!
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Wayne
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1103 on: Jul 9th, 2007, 6:45pm »
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What will be asked in the interview for a patent examiner position?  I got an interview opportunity in Canada patent office after successfully passing the written exam.  It will be a group interview, sounds quite different than the ones I had before for engineering jobs.  A little bit nervous....
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Anon Examiner
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1104 on: Jul 9th, 2007, 8:59pm »
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on Jul 9th, 2007, 6:45pm, Wayne wrote:
What will be asked in the interview for a patent examiner position?  I got an interview opportunity in Canada patent office after successfully passing the written exam.  It will be a group interview, sounds quite different than the ones I had before for engineering jobs.  A little bit nervous....

 
They'll likely ask you about your technical background.  But, you're almost guaranteed to know more about the art than the person you're interviewing with.
 
Also, they'll likely ask you what your motivation is for applying to the patent office because they'll want to know that you have some idea what you're getting into and that you will not leave after just a few months.
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