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   Working for the USPTO
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   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 342808 times)
Anon Examiner
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1085 on: Jul 5th, 2007, 10:07pm »
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on Jul 5th, 2007, 10:13am, MikeM wrote:

 
You can work your way up to GS-15 no matter what degree you came in with... your degree just determines your starting grade.  Getting GS-15 without becoming a SPE or such is difficult though.  You're not going to get GS-14 without becoming a primary examiner (full sig).

 
There are actually a lot of GS-14 examiners with partial sig.  If you achieve a master's rating in your art and pass the first half of the program (partial sig), then you become a GS-14 right away.  This is, of course, really nice, because your production requirement stays that of a GS-13.  It would be a great time to bill lots of overtime.  I *think* you need a master's degree to achieve a master's rating.
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Anon Examiner
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1086 on: Jul 5th, 2007, 10:17pm »
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on Jul 5th, 2007, 10:37am, MikeM wrote:

 
There is a GS-15 examiner program where you can get all the way to GS-15 without moving into management... There are various titles for it (expert examiner, etc), but they all amount to the same thing: be there a long time, have exemplary work, and be willing to accept a position factor of 1.5 for your production (which is a ridonkulous amount of work!)

 
You only have to be a GS-14 for one year before being promoted to GS-15.  I know someone that did this.  But, I think the additional money is hardly worth the stress.  Besides, as a GS-14 you can bill overtime whenever you want and make almost as much money.
 
If you want money that bad then I would suggest working on getting promoted to SPE.  All benefits included, SPEs make even more per actual hour worked than associates in firms.  SPEs even make more money than BPAI members since BPAI members don't get overtime or bonuses.
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MikeM
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1087 on: Jul 6th, 2007, 7:47am »
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on Jul 5th, 2007, 10:07pm, Anon Examiner wrote:

 
There are actually a lot of GS-14 examiners with partial sig.  If you achieve a master's rating in your art and pass the first half of the program (partial sig), then you become a GS-14 right away.  This is, of course, really nice, because your production requirement stays that of a GS-13.  It would be a great time to bill lots of overtime.  I *think* you need a master's degree to achieve a master's rating.

 
I've heard of this master's rating before... how exactly do you get it?  I've been told by a primary that some (if not many) SPEs just won't let you do it...
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Anxious_Canadate
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Posts: 1
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1088 on: Jul 6th, 2007, 4:36pm »
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First, thank you all for the wonderful resource that is this thread.
 
I have applied for a position at USPTO on 6.01.07 and now have some big decisions to make.
 
I am currently a law student in the DC area, just finished my second year at UDC (great school, but not for IP law).  I am interested in taking a break, three years of law school seems a waste without experiance in the areas I am interested.
 
I have completed the 'canidate questionaire'.
 
My understanding is that I am now waiting for a call for an interview, please correct me if I am wrong.
 
My problem is now what timeline to expect. It appears that it may be months before I even hear about a possible offer from USPTO and very soon I will have to start making decisions about Financial Aid and Fall class registration.
 
My understanding is that there are Patent Training Classes begining on Aug 20 and Sept 17.  
 
My Question: Is it realistic to think that I may be hiried that quickly? I have seen that it appears to take at least 3 months from interview to start date, is this the normal experiance? Thank you to anyone who can help a very anxious  canadate who is very excited about possibly working at the USPTO.
 
Background:
BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering
MS in Electrical Engineering
4+ years chip design
2 years of Law school (3.7)
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guest1040
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1089 on: Jul 6th, 2007, 6:30pm »
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on Jul 6th, 2007, 4:36pm, Anxious_Canadate wrote:
First, thank you all for the wonderful resource that is this thread.
 
I have applied for a position at USPTO on 6.01.07 and now have some big decisions to make.
 
I am currently a law student in the DC area, just finished my second year at UDC (great school, but not for IP law).  I am interested in taking a break, three years of law school seems a waste without experiance in the areas I am interested.
 
I have completed the 'canidate questionaire'.
 
My understanding is that I am now waiting for a call for an interview, please correct me if I am wrong.
 
My problem is now what timeline to expect. It appears that it may be months before I even hear about a possible offer from USPTO and very soon I will have to start making decisions about Financial Aid and Fall class registration.
 
My understanding is that there are Patent Training Classes begining on Aug 20 and Sept 17.  
 
My Question: Is it realistic to think that I may be hiried that quickly? I have seen that it appears to take at least 3 months from interview to start date, is this the normal experiance? Thank you to anyone who can help a very anxious  canadate who is very excited about possibly working at the USPTO.
 
Background:
BS in Electrical and Computer Engineering
MS in Electrical Engineering
4+ years chip design
2 years of Law school (3.7)

 
 
I'm just curious as to why you want to work for the PTO instead of completing your third year of school?  Since you have a great GPA and engineering degree, it sounds like you shouldn't have any problems landing an associate position at a law firm.  Are you planning on taking a year off from law school to work at the pto, or you planning on working while finishing up your third year?
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