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   Working for the USPTO
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   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 353687 times)
applied
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1030 on: Jun 21st, 2007, 6:37pm »
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2Btabby:
 
Thanks for your encouraging response.
 
How long does the background investigation take? Does USPTO use the SF-85 (National Trust), or the SF-86 (National Security) form?
 
When you said that you received your official offer by phone anywhere from 2 weeks to a month after that, was that after the clearance was granted?
 
By the way, I am very glad to hear that you like the job.
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applied
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1031 on: Jun 21st, 2007, 6:46pm »
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2Btabby:
 
Thanks for your encouraging response.
 
How long does background investigation take? Does the USPTO use the SF-85 (Public Trust) form, or the SF-86 form (National Security)?
 
When you say you received your official offer 2 weeks to a month after that, does that mean after the background investigation was completed and security clearance granted?
 
If USPTO gives me a short lead time between official offer (written) and the Academy training start date, I'll be very worried. Anything less than a month would be too short for me.
 
By the way, I am very glad to know that you like your job.
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applied
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1032 on: Jun 21st, 2007, 6:53pm »
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Sorry for the redundant post.
 
The first one got an error message saying I must not include any Wen link/address. I did not include any such thing !
 
So I retyped the post to avoid any hidden character in the first one.
 
To my surprise, both got posted !
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mandejapan
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1033 on: Jun 21st, 2007, 6:58pm »
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Hi 'Applied'.  I'm in the same boat as you.  Had a phone interview on June 13, and received an email almost right after the interview asking me to submit HSPD-12 and of306.  I did all that right away and they told me they received it and my unofficial transcripts were on file (through applicationmanager, usajobs).  A couple of days later I called up the secretary/admin lady that requested all of my forms and just asked her what I should expect next.  She said she put together my application package and submitted it to the TC Director for signature/approval.  Once he/she signs it, it moves on to the Patent Hiring Center...they do something with it, and then pass it on to the Human Resources Office and once the Human Resources Offices gives the final approval, they contact you via phone (first usually from what I've heard from a friend) and through a letter in the mail with a formal offer.  HRO has the final authority so until one receives a letter from them, yes, the offer is conditional.
 
I asked her about how long this process should take and she said it varies depending on how soon your PTA start date is, but to be safe she said it should not take longer than 3 weeks.  The SPE I interviewed with said he is trying to bring me on board to start on August 20.
 
What date are they planning to start you?  What Technology Center will you be in?  Maybe we'll be in the same PTA.  You can PM me if you'd like...I have several good friends who work as examiners there.
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gh
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1034 on: Jun 21st, 2007, 7:00pm »
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I think that Mr. Worry is pretty much dead-on with his questions.
 
Hereís the thing: your job as an examiner is really more legal than technical.  I agree with you that it seems like it should be the other way around, but itís not.  As evidence of what Iím talking about:  before examiners become managers they are often asked to do a rotation in an art they donít know very well at all.  The idea is that the key to examining is not the technical stuff, itís understanding the process of examining.  The latter is a lot less about real analysis than it is about shuffling people.  Sounds harsh, but it's true.
 
My personal view is that this is a mistake and that it results in a lot of wasted examining.  Iíve seen a lot of  office actions written by examiners who really donít have a clue about their art Ė people who are just hacking their way through the job.  Iím not sure the office minds this.  It seems like the important thing from the managementís perspective is to keep the paper flowing and the legal stuff right, even if the technical stuff is mucked up.  
 
After all, they hire a lot of examinerís who have zero technical experience, marginal bachelorís degrees in engineering and have graduated in the bottom of their classes.  A lot of these people are ideal for the job precisely because they donít know enough to realize they donít understand what theyíre doing.
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