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   Working for the USPTO
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   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 349934 times)
Anon
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #10 on: Feb 1st, 2005, 6:11pm »
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on Feb 1st, 2005, 3:00pm, Pat Grant wrote:
...nothing against the PTO or the good folks there, they just seem to have a problem competing with private sector jobs that pay much better.

 
When I applied in '97 for a position as a biotech examiner, over 1,000 applications had been submitted for 14 positions.   Of the 14 hired, 12 were PhDs.
 
Sure, the PTO has high turnover.  But that doesn't change the fact that, although many will apply, few will receive an offer.
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dandoe123
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #11 on: Feb 1st, 2005, 11:22pm »
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on Feb 1st, 2005, 6:11pm, Anon wrote:

 
When I applied in '97 for a position as a biotech examiner, over 1,000 applications had been submitted for 14 positions.   Of the 14 hired, 12 were PhDs.
 
Sure, the PTO has high turnover.  But that doesn't change the fact that, although many will apply, few will receive an offer.

 
considering the highly competitive nature of the positions, how does one better "prepare" himself for seeking such position?  
 
i'll be graduating with a PhD in immunology.  besides my publicationo record, recommendation, and interview... what exactly can i do to have a "better" chance?
 
thanks
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eric stasik
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #12 on: Feb 2nd, 2005, 1:53am »
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on Feb 1st, 2005, 3:00pm, Pat Grant wrote:
the PTO...  have a problem competing with private sector jobs that pay much better.

But because there is no better way to get those high paying private sector jobs than with USPTO/EPO experience they should have no shortage of qualified applicants.  
 
You can't simply compare salaries, but you have to take into account the considerable value of the intangible benefits of this work experience.  
 
Good luck JTripodo.  
 
regards,
 
eric stasik
« Last Edit: Feb 2nd, 2005, 1:54am by eric stasik » IP Logged

eric stasik
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Anon
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #13 on: Feb 2nd, 2005, 3:55am »
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on Feb 1st, 2005, 11:22pm, dandoe123 wrote:
i'll be graduating with a PhD in immunology.  besides my publicationo record, recommendation, and interview... what exactly can i do to have a "better" chance?

 
I was one of the 14 to be hired as a biotech examiner in '97.  How did I get the job?   I don't have the slightest idea.   Nonetheless, here are a few pointers you might want to consider:
 
Although there is no shortage of new applicants, the PTO has a problem retaining experienced Examiners.  Once examiners get their training, they often leave for higher paying (or equally paying, but less stressful) jobs.  In fact, many leave leave after just 1 year, and the majority leave within 2 or 3 years.  So without being too overt about it, present yourself as someone who will be around for longer than that.  (But don't over do it by claiming that you plan to become a career examiner. The interviewer will think you are lying or aren't very ambitious.)  And before you interview, you should also do considerable homework as to what an examiner actually does.  You'll need to explain why you want to leave the lab to do this sort of work.  You might even want to learn a little patent law so you can "talk the talk" during your interview.  If you haven't already done so, have a look at the MPEP.  You might even want to read chapters 700 and 2100 (or parts thereof) just to get a feel for it.  Have a look here...
 
http://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/mpep/indext.htm
 
Hope the above helps.
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JTripodo
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #14 on: Feb 2nd, 2005, 6:31am »
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Wow, Excellent information!
 
I recently started studying for the patent exam using the PatBar program and will definitely check into those topics further that you mentioned.
 
Thanks,
John
 
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