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(Message started by: PatentDraftsman on Nov 13th, 2004, 9:40am)

Title: Patent Drawings
Post by PatentDraftsman on Nov 13th, 2004, 9:40am
Yesterday, (11/12/04) I discovered this forum.

I was surprised when a Search for the word “drawings” resulted: “Sorry, not matches were found”.

I’ve been successfully producing patent drawings for more than 30 years. I’ve migrated from pen and ink to the latest technical illustration technologies.

If you have any questions regarding patent drawings, I’ll be happy to offer my experience and opinions.

At my desk,

PatentDraftsman

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by JimIvey on Nov 13th, 2004, 11:03am
I'll ask one ... two.

1.  I'm seeing more and more drawings with shading (e.g., screen captures) be accepted and published as formal drawings, e.g., on an issued patent.  On one of mine, the patent issued with the informal drawings rather than the formal drawings that we submitted (representing not insignificant cost to the client).  The odd thing (as if that weren't odd enough) is that there were two applications sharing identical sets of drawings, the other issued with the formal drawings.

Has there been a relaxation of the requirements for formal drawings?

2.  It's been a while since I looked as design patent applications.  Can they be filed with informal drawings?

Many thanks.

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by PatentDraftsman on Nov 13th, 2004, 12:23pm
JimIvey:

Great questions/observations.

Your first question regarding shading is a grey area. (No pun intended.) I’ve prepared formal, informal and provisional drawings using screen captures. And, at the attorney's request, I’ve also hand (computer vector) traced screen capture content and reset the type – just to eliminate all grey tones. Unfortunately, this is one of those areas where the appropriate solution seems to depend on the particular examiner conducting the review.

That said, here’s another twist (or possible solution). I believe some attorneys submit screen captures as photographs. This way, the grey tones (or color picked up in the screen captures) are reviewed as photos rather than drawings.

Your second question is easier. Sure, informal design drawings are quite common. However, if you submit informal design drawings, you’re asking for trouble. It’s almost impossible not to introduce new matter while formalizing informal design drawings. And, the inconsistency between views becomes apparent when preparing the formal drawings. So, if the draftsman follows the informal drawings exactly, the odds are there will be ambiguity between the views. If the draftsman corrects the problems inherent with the informal drawings, the examiner is likely to scream “new matter, new matter”. My advice is to submit high quality accurate formal design drawings to begin with. Even with all that going for you, the examiner is sure to complain about something (shading, contours, jots and tittles, etc.).

Hope this helps,

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by JimIvey on Nov 13th, 2004, 4:51pm
Thanks!  That helps.

Re screen captures.  I still file informal drawings and wait for them to complain.  Most are considered good enough for publication of the application.  We prepare formal drawings when requested by the PTO.

Interesting point on design applications.  It makes sense since there's really no text on which to rely for what's "material" and what's not.

Thanks again.

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by PatentDraftsman on Nov 14th, 2004, 7:13am

on 11/13/04 at 16:51:18, JimIvey wrote:
Thanks!  That helps.
......We prepare formal drawings when requested by the PTO.

Thanks again.


Many attorneys take this approach. It’s my opinion that the formal drawings should be done upfront for many reasons.

With contemporary technologies, 90% of the time it’s just as easy (and cost effective) to prepare formal drawings from the “get go”. Also, readily available source materials (engineering drawings, photos, sketches, prototypes) have a tendency to get lost over time and become unavailable when it’s time to prepare the formal drawings. If the formal drawings are done upfront, the draftsman can ask for additional source materials that maybe harder to procure (or impossible) a year or so later. And finally, it is my experience that it’s more cost effective to do the formal drawings upfront. If you’re interested, I can support this argument with additional details.


Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by jkudla on Nov 14th, 2004, 2:15pm
Good topic. Patent drawings are such an integral part of the patent process but I rarily see much discussion on them.

Here is my laundry list of observations, please feel free to add your opinion or experience:

When the publication rules for newly submitted patent app. figures went into affect in early 2001, many people at my firm interpreted it to mean that informal figures would only be accepted to secure a filing date and that formal figures would be required soon after filing. For example, via a Notice of Missing Parts. It generally turned out that the patent office would only require new figures if the informals violated the margin rules. As a general rule, we generally will always obtain formal figures before an applicaiton is filed.

Regarding informal figures issuing into patents, it has been my experience that the figure rules are applied rather unevenly and is rather dependent on the Examiner and various other patent office personnel. I have had the unfortunate experience of not noticing an informal figure and it made it into the issued patent. As a result, it is another thing on my issue fee checklist to make sure they are in order.


I have also seen notices from the patent office requiring the submission of formal figures before they would issue a patent.

Yet another experience is an Examiner that required me to submit formal figures in response to an Office Action. This particular application was filed, with informal figures, sometime in 1999 and an Applicant can request for drawing objections to be held in abeyance until a Notice of Allowance was sent, for applications filed back then. I think the magical date is for applications filed before the publication rules went into effect - January 2001 or so. The Examiner  didn't want to budge on this one, so I just complied with his wishes since I was pretty sure of this application going to issue and I would have obtained formal figures at some later point.

Regarding draftsperson rates, what do you consider to be reasonable? My preferred drafting company (Patents Ink of Baltimore) charges about $75 per drawing sheet on average. I think this is on the more expensive side. However, they do consistently excellent work with fast turnaround. I once tried out a cheaper drafting company but was rather unsatisfied for a variety of reasons.


Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by PatentDraftsman on Nov 14th, 2004, 2:59pm
Good topic. Patent drawings are such an integral      part of the patent process but I rarily see much discussion on them.

Here is my laundry list of observations, please feel free to add your opinion or experience:

jkudla says: When the publication rules for newly submitted patent app. figures went into affect in early 2001, many people at my firm interpreted it to mean that informal figures would only be accepted to secure a filing date and that formal figures would be required soon after filing.

PatentDraftsman says: I remember it like it was yesterday. I received a dozen calls from attorneys wondering how to interpret the new rules. Bottom line, it seemed like another good reason to (if possible) submit formal drawings to begin with.

jkudla says:  For example, via a Notice of Missing Parts. It generally turned out that the patent office would only require new figures if the informals violated the margin rules. As a general rule, we generally will always obtain formal figures before an applicaiton is filed.

PatentDraftsman says: Margins! Yikes! And what about them blurry lines? Sometimes I’ll draw outside the lines (margins) just to keep the examiner from noticing “real” problems with the drawings. (Only kidding!)

jkudla says: Regarding informal figures issuing into patents, it has been my experience that the figure rules are applied rather unevenly and is rather dependent on the Examiner and various other patent office personnel.

PatentDraftsman says: Don’t get me started!!!

jkudla says: I have had the unfortunate experience of not noticing an informal figure and it made it into the issued patent.

PatentDraftsman says: I laugh out loud every time that happens. (Consequently, I do a lot of laughing.) However, it’s no laughing matter when you have to spend your time (and money) kicking around unimportant minutia with a stubborn examiner.

jkudla says: I have also seen notices from the patent office requiring the submission of formal figures before they would issue a patent.  

PatentDraftsman says: I’m not up to speed with the attorney’s responsibility, but I thought formal drawings were always required before issue.

jkudla says:  Yet another experience is an Examiner that required me to submit formal figures in response to an Office Action. This particular application was filed, with informal figures, sometime in 1999 and an Applicant can request for drawing objections to be held in abeyance until a Notice of Allowance was sent, for applications filed back then. I think the magical date is for applications filed before the publication rules went into effect - January 2001 or so. The Examiner  didn't want to budge on this one, so I just complied with his wishes since I was pretty sure of this application going to issue and I would have obtained formal figures at some later point.

PatentDraftsman says: Sometimes it’s better just to comply. You’re lucky the examiner didn’t ask you to stand on one foot and howl at the moon. Whatever it takes…….

jkudla says: Regarding draftsperson rates, what do you consider to be reasonable? My preferred drafting company (Patents Ink of Baltimore) charges about $75 per drawing sheet on average. I think this is on the more expensive side. However, they do consistently excellent work with fast turnaround. I once tried out a cheaper drafting company but was rather unsatisfied for a variety of reasons.

PatentDraftsman says: The rates you quoted sound very reasonable. I suggest that you prepare your client spend an average of $500 for the drawings. Of course the actual price can range from much less to much more. But generally speaking an “average” design or utility application (in my experience) should cost about $500 (usually a little less).

PatentDraftsman


Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by JimIvey on Nov 18th, 2004, 12:27pm

on 11/14/04 at 14:15:17, jkudla wrote:
Yet another experience is an Examiner that required me to submit formal figures in response to an Office Action. ... The Examiner  didn't want to budge on this one, so I just complied with his wishes since I was pretty sure of this application going to issue and I would have obtained formal figures at some later point.

I seem to see this one when there's some error in the numbering of elements of the figures (either in the figures themselves or in the specification such as an incorrectly numbered reference).  For example, the drawings show a widget 10 and a dooh hickey 20 and the specification refers to a widget 10 and a dooh hickey 12.  It's an easy fix, but the error is one that could conceivably lead to confusion rather than simply a problem with letter height or shading.

As for filing with formal drawings, for some of my clients, deferring $500 is significant.  

Re Notices to File Missing Part, I believe they were listing formal drawings as required in the response for a while.  The PTO appears to have stopped making that requirement in the Notice to File Missing Parts.

Thanks for all the input.

Regards.

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by PatentDraftsman on Nov 19th, 2004, 7:40am

on 11/18/04 at 12:27:18, JimIvey wrote:
As for filing with formal drawings, for some of my clients, deferring $500 is significant.  


Certainly.....

And the key word in your comment regarding rates is "some".

Like I said:

PatentDraftsman says: The rates you quoted sound very reasonable. I suggest that you prepare your client spend an average of $500 for the drawings. Of course the actual price can range from much less to much more. But generally speaking an “average” design or utility application (in my experience) should cost about $500 (usually a little less).

I've studied the wages for patent draftsmen and technical illustrators. As president of the ISTI (International Society for Technical Illustrators) and a member of the STC (Society for Technical Communication) I've been asked many times to suggest a reasonable per hour rate for technical drawings. Of course, as in all fields there are many considerations including education, experience, proficiency, skill, geographic location, etc., etc.

At the end of the day, a skilled and proficient patent draftsman or technical illustrator should realize $40 - $60 per hr. It’s easy to imagine an illustrator spending 10 hrs on a patent application (including client conference if applicable, information management, production, invoicing, etc.). So, 10hrs X $50 per seems plenty fair to me.

PatentDraftsman

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by james yang on May 9th, 2005, 5:52pm
Where are you located patentdraftman?  and, do you accept work?

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by conleymon on May 21st, 2005, 12:27pm
hi, I'm very interested in patent drawing, but I'm totally new to it. I have gotten the guide to making patent drawings from the us pto site, but before I start reading it, I really would like to know more about how I can find work, what qualifications I need, what's the best way to learn how to do it, is it secure work and things like that. May I ask you for any advice you might be able to offer?

thank you much,
conleymon

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by JimIvey on May 23rd, 2005, 1:36pm
If I were considering a new vendor for drawings, I'd want to see sample work fairly closely resembling the kinds of drawings I'd need and then would look at prices.

The thing is to be in the list of vendors considered when a practitioner is looking for a new one.  Personally, I'd probably start with people who contribute in a forum like this one, if they seem to know what they're doing.  I might try a search engine, or perhaps even ads at a site like this one, but I'd be a little afraid of too much "noise" and not enough "signal."

For the record, I'm happy with my current vendor.  I hope those thoughts help.

Regards.

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by StefanL on May 26th, 2005, 1:33pm
I belive that if an application "looks well-prepared" the examiner is more likely to think that the application is "serious" and thereby unconsciously favour the application.


Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by StefanL on May 27th, 2005, 10:28am
yes I meant subconsciously 8)

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by Greg L. Martinez on Sep 17th, 2005, 2:59am
When doing the spec and the drawings, I often label similar elements with letter and numbers (i.e. 10a, 10b, etc.).  My question is whether or not anyone has had problems with this in US or foreign filings.  I have not, but some attorneys I have done work for swear up and down that its inappropriate.  

Also, has anyone had any problems with lead lines.  For example, the MPEP states that a floating arrow signifies a section and a lead line touching an element signifies a surface.  I've seen attorneys ignore this convention and they seem to get away with it on a regular basis.  It seems like this convention is not strictly enforced.  

Thanks in advance.  

Greg L. Martinez
SolidStateIP

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by gregm170 on Sep 17th, 2005, 3:12am
When doing the spec and the drawings, I often label similar elements with letter and numbers (i.e. 10a, 10b, etc.).  My question is whether or not anyone has had problems with this in US or foreign filings.  I have not, but some attorneys I have done work for swear up and down that its inappropriate.  

Also, has anyone had any problems with lead lines.  For example, the MPEP states that a floating arrow signifies a section and a lead line touching an element signifies a surface.  I've seen attorneys ignore this convention and they seem to get away with it on a regular basis.  It seems like this convention is not strictly enforced.  

Thanks in advance.  

Greg L. Martinez
SolidStateIP
www.solidstateip.com

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by gregm170 on Sep 17th, 2005, 3:13am
When doing the spec and the drawings, I often label similar elements with letter and numbers (i.e. 10a, 10b, etc.).  My question is whether or not anyone has had problems with this in US or foreign filings.  I have not, but some attorneys I have done work for swear up and down that its inappropriate.  

Also, has anyone had any problems with lead lines.  For example, the MPEP states that a floating arrow signifies a section and a lead line touching an element signifies a surface.  I've seen attorneys ignore this convention and they seem to get away with it on a regular basis.  It seems like this convention is not strictly enforced.  

Thanks in advance.  

Greg L. Martinez
SolidStateIP
www.solidstateip.com

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by Isaac Clark on Sep 17th, 2005, 6:22am
There is a document called "Guide for the Preparation of Patent Drawings" which is published by the GPO.  It goes into these questions and others in detail with examples.

I don't know if the reference is still available from the government, but the last time I googled for it, so downloadable copies turned up.  Get the most recent edition you can find.

I don't know if any reason why 10a, 10b, would be considered inappropriate or
undesirable in a US case.

One reason why people get away with informalities is that the
PTO does not use draftspeople to review drawings anymore.  Normally
the only pre-examination objections you will get are for improper
margins.  Sometimes that problem is caused by the person scanning your
drawings.

Many examiners won't spend much time reviewing/objecting to drawings
unless the problems are glaring or create problems for them in
understanding your application.  There is not much training on the
detailed concerns with drawings anyway.

Lead lines are supposed to touch a part.  A floating arrow has
several possible uses including pointing to a whole object or section
when you are also using lead lines to touch a part of the same
object.  I really would not be persuaded to ignore a rule because
your peers are getting away with it.  Getting the drawings done
right may matter to your clients at an important point such as
during litigation.

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by JimIvey on Sep 17th, 2005, 11:51am
I'll admit (here in front of God and everybody) that I may be one of those who ignored the leadline issue.  However, my defense is that my specifications, in describing what the leadlines point to, are clear.

When it doubt, spell it out (in the spec).

It's good that you recognize potential ambiguity and/or vagueness.  Be sure to resolve those ambiguities and/or vaguenesses in the spec.

Re drawings generally, they're not even absolutely required -- only when "helpful" as I recall.  I'm inclined to opine that insufficiency of a drawing should not be sufficient to overcome any presumption of validity of an issued patent.  But I won't go that far today.  And, outright contradiction of the spec (or an introduction of ambiguity in the drawings not already present in the spec) might be a different story.

Regards.

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by gregm170 on Sep 18th, 2005, 3:13am
Ooops.  I'm not sure why I have multiple posts.   ??? Sorry about that.  It's even annoying to me.  

Thanks for they answers.  I think most of the problems I hear about are just personal preferences by different people and don't actually matter.  I've noticed in doing work for different attorneys that each has his own way of doing something and if you do it differently, then it must be wrong.  

To me its just different, but not necessarily wrong.  Maybe if you do the same thing long enough, you begin the think that its the right way of doing it.  

Greg L. Martinez
SolidStateIP
www.solidstateip.com

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by Isaac Clark on Sep 18th, 2005, 5:49am
Perhaps some of the more picky things are not important and the practioner would be advised to spend his time elsewhere, but there is a "right" way to do some of these things.

Rule 84 describes things like lead lines, the proper use of freestanding arrows, size of lettering,
etc.  Perhaps a practitioner doing his own drawings might not
spend much time on some details, but if I would certainly expect
a professional illustrator to get these things right, and in fact
the ones I've worked with have corrected informalities in the stuff I've
given to them.

But certainly some things are left up to the particular practioner
the rules say "numbers are preferred" for reference characters.
If some attorney mentoring or supervising you, or your firms guidelines
are to use numbers only, then I think energy spent fighting that
is not justifiable.

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by gregm170 on Sep 30th, 2005, 1:53am
Mr. Clark said "I don't know if any reason why 10a, 10b, would be considered inappropriate or undesirable in a US case. "

Would using 10a, 10b, etc. be a problem in a PCT?

Greg L. Martinez
SolidStateIP
www.solidstateip.com





Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by ChrisGegg on Oct 5th, 2005, 4:16pm
Thanks to PatentDraftsman for starting this discussion.

I have one observation to add that all attorneys may want to consider and all draftspersons may want to use as encouragement for attorneys to file formal drawings when the application is originally filed.

Recently the USPTO has implemented a slightly different image scanning process which captures graphics ONLY in black and white, not greyscale which was only used for a short time period, but no longer uses.  And even if graphics look like they may be greyscale, look closely and you will notice that what your eyes see as greyscale actually is just stippling (pixellation of black dots).

So what does this mean?, what impact does the purely black and white scanning have?  Any drawings which are submitted that are not line drawings have a high chance of being seriously distorted.  In particular, any screen captures and digital images which are filed as informal drawings are likely to turn into entirely black blobs which provide the Examiner little or no opportunity to fairly and accurately examine your application.  (Check some of your PAIR drawings, you might be surprised that some are completely useless.)  And do not necessarily expect to receive a Notice to File Corrected Papers from the initial examination office, because they make their determination based on the actual paper documents which are filed, not the scanned documents.  Which means that the initial examination office does not know what the scan will look like, and does not typically issue a Notice to File Corrected Papers based on greyscale drawings, even though the scan of those greyscale drawings may not reproduce correctly.

Unfortunately, not all Examiners will follow MPEP guidance and immediately request corrected drawings.  Some Examiners will proceed with the black blobs on the electronic file wrapper and presume that what they have in front of them is what you provided for them to work with when examining the application.  This can present a serious problem when an examiner proceeds to examine a case without the benefit of drawings which can be interpreted.  And then you have the problem of establishing that the corrected drawings do not introduce new matter.  The Examiner has to request to review the originally filed materials so he/she can see that the corrected drawings actually reflect what was originally filed, but turned into black blobs when scanned.

So, a word of caution to anyone who ever files digital images or screen captures.  If the informal drawing has areas of similar brightness, regardless of colors shading, etc., the drawing should be prepared as a formal line drawing before filing.

Chris Gegg
Alston & Bird LLP

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by JimIvey on Oct 10th, 2005, 11:44am
Your points are well-taken.  I'll offer a few tips re acceptable, if not formal, drawings.

First, I use OpenOffice.org which includes a draw program (free).  It's easy to use and I can produce nice black and white drawings almost as quickly as sketching by hand.  

Second, I frequently include screenshots (since I do a lot of software applications) and they can include shaded areas and/or color images.  Most screen shots translate nicely to black and white, but some require some modification.  I use gimp to convert it to a black and white outline using edge detection and some color space manipulation.  

Here's another interesting idea for handling color images: http://www.squaregear.net/gimptips/wood.shtml

I'll show you guys what I mean when some of my recent applications are published.

Regards,

Jim

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by Isaac Clark on Oct 10th, 2005, 12:05pm
Jim,

One thing I find very interesting is your use of open source software to do your work.  The use of open document formats in particular has gotten some recent publicity with the Mass state government's initiative to require the use of document formats that do not have vendor lock in.

I'm not currently in a position to select my own tools...

Have you had any issues of note with respect to submitting patent applications electronically?   I realize that hardly anyone actually uses electronic submittal, but I was wondering if it's even possible to do so without using Word.

I know of one practitioner that was used to use a free Autocad clone to do his drawings, but I believe that practitioner is working at a firm now.


Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by JimIvey on Oct 10th, 2005, 1:16pm
Hi Isaac,

I've never been able to successfully complete an electronic filing of a patent application.  Back when it first came out, I was using WordPerfect -- yes, I'm a rebel at heart!  ;-)

The implementation for WordPerfect was not that great.  I was never able to author a document without XML errors.  Every attempt ended up in a frantic conversion to paper filing.  Luckily, I'm on the West Coast and my deadline is 3 hours later if I file paper.

The Figures were required to be in TIFF format.  That's easy with OpenOffice.org.  I recently looked into electronic filing again.  WordPerfect is no longer supported.  Only Word.  And, only in XP (maybe 2k).  That means about $500 or so to get one machine capable of filing electronically (I have no XP systems -- only up to 2k).  

If I can get someone in the USPTO to share their XML schema with me, I can use any of a number of open source XML editors to author applications.  I've thought about getting MS Office in XP running here (may be time to upgrade my laptop anyway and they all seem to come with XP) and seeing if I can't extract the XML schema from there.  Of course, if it ever changes, I'm pretty much screwed.

Of course, private PAIR requires Windows.  My laptop has a Windows 2K partition and that's were I do my private PAIR stuff.  It's still not practical to shun Windows altogether.

For what it's worth, OpenOffice.org is available for Windows and is a great alternative for drawings.  It also reads and writes Office formats (but not Visio -- nothing reads Visio except Visio).

I'd be happy to share more of my office set up if anyone cares.

Regards.

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by Jonathan on Oct 10th, 2005, 1:51pm
For what its worth, patent attorney Raymond Roberts of Intellectual Property Law Offices (iplo.com) occasionally offers e-filing classes thru the Sunnyvale Center for I, I and I (Sci-cubed, can't recall all the I's offhand). I attended one a few years back and he is pretty knowledgable on this topic.

Looks like a new .pdf-based version of e-filing will be coming out soon, however, and will hopefully be easier to use.

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by JimIvey on Oct 11th, 2005, 10:10am
Wow!  PDF would be great!  It's certainly no more work than receiving paper, but probably more work than receiving XML.

For what it's worth, this is closer to what I do with photos/screenshots in the figures:
http://www.gimp.org/tutorials/Sketch_Effect/

I do the final tweaking in the "levels" tool a little differently to get the lines bolder, but you get the idea.

That should photocopy/scan/fax well (and my drawings do -- I've done some tests).

Regards.

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by Peach on Oct 18th, 2005, 8:49pm
As a newbie to the forum, I have question. I want to register a Patent. I know exactly how to present it, but I need drawings and instructions, and I need to know what to do next as far as registering it. I do not want to spend money on attorneys unless I have to. Any help gratefully received.

peachey@totallyflorida.com

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by Wiscagent on Oct 18th, 2005, 9:16pm
The United States Patent and Trademark (USPTO) web site is a good place to get started learning about patents.

Note that in the United States patents are not "registered".  An individual must apply for the patent and the USPTO examines the application.  If the application meets the legal requirements and the invention is novel and not obvious, then the USPTO grants a patent.

Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by fig.one on Oct 20th, 2005, 6:31pm

on 09/18/05 at 03:13:47, gregm170 wrote:
Ooops.  I'm not sure why I have multiple posts.   ??? Sorry about that.  It's even annoying to me.  

Thanks for they answers.  I think most of the problems I hear about are just personal preferences by different people and don't actually matter.  I've noticed in doing work for different attorneys that each has his own way of doing something and if you do it differently, then it must be wrong.  

To me its just different, but not necessarily wrong.  Maybe if you do the same thing long enough, you begin the think that its the right way of doing it.  

Greg L. Martinez
SolidStateIP
www.solidstateip.com


Title: Re: Patent Drawings
Post by JimRef on May 20th, 2006, 12:49pm
I am working to prepare a patent application with a patent agent.  The patent agent wants me to talk directly with the patent draftsperson to develop an initial set of drawings.  Is it OK to talk with the draftsperson or do I have to worry about what I say not being confidential?



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