The Intellectual Property Law Server

Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register.
Oct 30th, 2020, 3:36pm

Forums Forums Help Help Search Search Members Members Calendar Calendar Login Login Register Register
   Intellectual Property Forums
  
  
I have an Invention ... Now What?
(Moderators: Forum Admin, JimIvey, JSonnabend)
   Disclosure Document Deposit Request
« Previous topic | Next topic »
Pages: 1 2 3  Reply Reply Send Topic Send Topic Print Print
   Author  Topic: Disclosure Document Deposit Request  (Read 2052 times)
Jp
Junior Member
**




   
Email

Posts: 52
Re: Disclosure Document Deposit Request
« Reply #5 on: Dec 2nd, 2006, 9:16am »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Then of course you would have to depend on the FBI,
to check lab notes and that will never work, and you can buy that. . . especially if that is what you are use to buying, how else could you afford public defence, or you could go broke and die of old age while waiting for an idiot to come along.  
 
Jp
 
« Last Edit: Dec 2nd, 2006, 1:14pm by Jp » IP Logged

The Owner Of An Invention Usually Is The Inventor.
Jp
Junior Member
**




   
Email

Posts: 52
Re: Disclosure Document Deposit Request
« Reply #6 on: Dec 2nd, 2006, 1:28pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

Then of course if you have a receipt number in your posession for a provisional patent, and when the time comes you find out that they don't have any record of that number. Don't think it can't happen.  
I am not stuck on DDP, I am only saying that the USPTO, doesn't seem to be granting any value to documentations other than a PP, and that can turn out to be dangerous. Oh, and I think you will remember the cost and twelve years are man with the windshield wipers paid. he was a one man army who needed an army, but didn't have one to come to his aid. He took a beating and for what, so that one man can be right, when all the others were wrong, but he was against the world of innocent do gooders who do things in the best interest of what they call, and I hate to say this but, what they would say, "is their country" ?  
So, very shallow !
 
 
Jp
 
 
 
 
« Last Edit: Dec 2nd, 2006, 2:04pm by Jp » IP Logged

The Owner Of An Invention Usually Is The Inventor.
Jp
Junior Member
**




   
Email

Posts: 52
Re: Disclosure Document Deposit Request
« Reply #7 on: Dec 6th, 2006, 8:26am »
Quote Quote Modify Modify


OK, I jumped the gun ! I will admit to being a little paranoid but not to being an idiot !
 
You tell me, When I get an idea for an invention, should I file a PP first off or should I during the inspiration and development stage, document the invention in some way for example,, . . to write,(type), out the disclosure and claim discription, have a copy made, and have that copy notarized for the date and possibly witnessed.  
( The copy would be used since it could be verified as not having any changes added to it after it has been notarized.) What would you suggest ?
 
Jp
IP Logged

The Owner Of An Invention Usually Is The Inventor.
Bill Richards
Full Member
***




   
WWW Email

Posts: 758
Re: Disclosure Document Deposit Request
« Reply #8 on: Dec 6th, 2006, 12:58pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

The "glimmer" of an idea is probably not going to be sufficient to flesh out a patent application.  (Although I've drafted some applications with little else!)
What you suggest in terms of documenting your invention is probably more belt-and-suspenders than you need, but, if it's done properly, will give you what you want.  (Not sure the notarizing is necessary and I've never seen it done.  Witnessing is a good idea because the uncorroborated testimony of the inventor is generally insufficient if evidence of date of invention (or who did what) is required.)
The thing to keep in mind is that the invention must be "flesh out" enough to provide enough information to enable someone to make and use it.
IP Logged

William B. Richards, P.E.
The Richards Law Firm
Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights
614/939-1488
Isaac
Senior Member
****




   


Posts: 3472
Re: Disclosure Document Deposit Request
« Reply #9 on: Dec 7th, 2006, 12:13pm »
Quote Quote Modify Modify

When documenting inventive activities, the important dates are the dates of conception and the date of reducing the invention to practice.  For the time period between conception and reduction to practice, it may be necessary to show diligent progress to reduction to practice.
 
A properly drafted and filed patent application (provisional or otherwise) is evidence of both reduction to practice and conception at the date of filing, but is useless to establish any earlier date.   If proof an earlier conception date is needed, a patent application is useless.
 
On the other hand, a properly kept inventors notebook can document conception, reduction to practice and diligence.   If the notebook is maintained as a regularly kept business record of the inventors activities, probably the notarizing isn't so necessary.  
 
I believe there is plenty of guidance out there on how to keep a inventor's proper notebook.  I'm not an expert on the topic.
 
In any event a provisional is not a substitute for a notebook.    
 
IP Logged

Isaac
Pages: 1 2 3  Reply Reply Send Topic Send Topic Print Print

« Previous topic | Next topic »
Powered by YaBB 1 Gold - SP 1.3.2!
Forum software copyright 2000-2004 Yet another Bulletin Board