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I have an Invention ... Now What?
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   I have an intellectual property... what to do?
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   Author  Topic: I have an intellectual property... what to do?  (Read 883 times)
KDoyle
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I have an intellectual property... what to do?
« on: Jan 14th, 2005, 1:41pm »
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As a result of my master's dissertation, I have developed a successful "program" that could be taught to professionals within the field. I have been approached to write an article about this new system/program and, furthermore, I have been consulted to farm the "program" techniques as an outside, consultant/hired corporate trainer.  
 
I am certain the I would need to protect the idea/program but have no idea how to. Any advice... please keep in mind that although I am quite resourceful, I have very tight financial resource.
 
Thanks!
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Isaac
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Re: I have an intellectual property... what to do?
« Reply #1 on: Jan 14th, 2005, 4:21pm »
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A masters dissertation might constitute a publication that
would be prior art to a filing outside the US, and also as
prior art inside the US 1 year after publication.  If so, that would
seem to eliminate the obvious possibilities of protecting
your techniques (namely applying getting a patent).
 
But there are some warts in US law on the issue so perhaps
its worth discussing things with an IP professional.
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Isaac
marucoke
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Re: I have an intellectual property... what to do?
« Reply #2 on: Jan 30th, 2005, 12:00pm »
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It is quite possible that the university might own the rights to your invention.  Please check with your university's technology transfer office.  When I was in graduate school, I was required to sign such a form assigning any IP rights in anything I created while being employed by the university.  (I was a teaching assistant.)  I basically was told that I had to sign the document or else I couldn't get paid.
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Chris Meuller
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Re: I have an intellectual property... what to do?
« Reply #3 on: Mar 2nd, 2005, 1:00pm »
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on Jan 30th, 2005, 12:00pm, marucoke wrote:
I was required to sign such a form assigning any IP rights in anything I created while being employed by the university.  (I was a teaching assistant.)

 
What if you came up with something independent of the U.?
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Jonathan
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Re: I have an intellectual property... what to do?
« Reply #4 on: Mar 2nd, 2005, 3:30pm »
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on Jan 14th, 2005, 4:21pm, Isaac Clark wrote:
A masters dissertation might constitute a publication that
would be prior art to a filing outside the US, and also as
prior art inside the US 1 year after publication.  If so, that would
seem to eliminate the obvious possibilities of protecting
your techniques (namely applying getting a patent).
 
But there are some warts in US law on the issue so perhaps
its worth discussing things with an IP professional.

 
To further expand on Mr. Clark's correct statement that the dissertation may constitute prior art, the general rule for an academic dissertation to be considered prior art is that it be catalogued at a library and at least accessible to that portion of the public that would be interested in seeing it. For example, a person of skill in the involved art.  
 
Refer to MPEP 2128.01 for more details (the beginning portion of which is reproduced below):
 
2128.01 Level of Public Accessibility  
 
 
A THESIS PLACED IN A UNIVERSITY LIBRARY MAY BE PRIOR ART IF SUFFICIENTLY ACCESSIBLE TO THE PUBLIC  
 
A doctoral thesis indexed and shelved in a library is sufficiently accessible to the public to constitute prior art as a "printed publication." In re Hall, 781 F.2d 897, 228 USPQ 453 (Fed. Cir. 1986). Even if access to the library is restricted, a reference will constitute a "printed publication" as long as a presumption is raised that the portion of the public concerned with the art would know of the invention. In re Bayer, 568 F.2d 1357, 196 USPQ 670 (CCPA 197Cool.  
 
 
« Last Edit: Mar 2nd, 2005, 7:27pm by Jonathan » IP Logged
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