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   Working for the USPTO
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   Author  Topic: Working for the USPTO  (Read 353184 times)
sam31sam
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1000 on: Jun 8th, 2007, 9:32pm »
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QQ wrote,
 
"Hi,  
 
My main concern/question relating to the risk of getting fired within the probationary year is:  
 
The technical requirement for the PE job is a B.Sc. degree in EE.  
 
How can the USPTO expect a new graduate in EE (and even those with just a year or two experience) to be able to proof-read and verify the viability of those circuit diagrams that most probably will come with the patent application, in a short time frame? I assume that a PE's job is to make sure that the EE art actually will work which will take a great deal of time (circuit diagrams), in addition to the ensurance of the claims. Let's all face it, how much can a 4-year college education really prepare you for "proving" the workability of a EE invention? Not that much.  
 
Some of you probably will say "stop worry too much too early!". But for those of us still in the application pipeline, it is better know it ahead of time whether the USPTO has under-stated the job requirements, or may be I am misunderstanding that the PE job simply does not require that much technical skill (beyond those taught in the 4 years of college). Jumping into a job with the incorrect expectation can be suicidal carrer-wise.  
 
Current and/or former Patent Examiners please comment on my question.  
 
Thanks! "
 
 
This is actually a good question ince I've been out of college for some time now. I haven't actually performed any engineering or design functions on my previous jobs and am probabily a bit rusty. I learned the stuff in college once, I'm sure i can pick it up again. But to what extent does the USPTO expect one to know design/engineering? especially those who have been out of college for some time.
 
 
 
Side note  
 
qq, mk1023, Current_Examiner
 
do you guys know of anyone looking for a roommate. I start on July 9th and would be looking to rent/lease on July 1st. If not, do you guys have any recommendations on where to live? Any help would be greately appreciated. TIA
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sam31sam
Guest
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1001 on: Jun 8th, 2007, 9:34pm »
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QQ wrote,
 
"Hi,  
 
My main concern/question relating to the risk of getting fired within the probationary year is:  
 
The technical requirement for the PE job is a B.Sc. degree in EE.  
 
How can the USPTO expect a new graduate in EE (and even those with just a year or two experience) to be able to proof-read and verify the viability of those circuit diagrams that most probably will come with the patent application, in a short time frame? I assume that a PE's job is to make sure that the EE art actually will work which will take a great deal of time (circuit diagrams), in addition to the ensurance of the claims. Let's all face it, how much can a 4-year college education really prepare you for "proving" the workability of a EE invention? Not that much.  
 
Some of you probably will say "stop worry too much too early!". But for those of us still in the application pipeline, it is better know it ahead of time whether the USPTO has under-stated the job requirements, or may be I am misunderstanding that the PE job simply does not require that much technical skill (beyond those taught in the 4 years of college). Jumping into a job with the incorrect expectation can be suicidal carrer-wise.  
 
Current and/or former Patent Examiners please comment on my question.  
 
Thanks! "
 
 
This is actually a good question ince I've been out of college for some time now. I haven't actually performed any engineering or design functions on my previous jobs and am probabily a bit rusty. I learned the stuff in college once, I'm sure i can pick it up again. But to what extent does the USPTO expect one to know design/engineering? especially those who have been out of college for some time.
 
 
 
Side note  
 
qq, mk1023, Current_Examiner
 
do you guys know of anyone looking for a roommate. I start on July 9th and would be looking to rent/lease on July 1st. If not, do you guys have any recommendations on where to live? Any help would be greately appreciated. TIA
IP Logged
sam31sam
Newbie
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Posts: 1
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1002 on: Jun 8th, 2007, 9:40pm »
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sorry for the double post guys. My web browser never showed the first post after I refreshed the page multiple times. If there is a moderator please delete this post and one of the duplicate posts. Thanks.
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aa
Newbie
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Posts: 8
Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1003 on: Jun 8th, 2007, 11:09pm »
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on Jun 8th, 2007, 4:55pm, qq wrote:
Hi,
 
My main concern/question relating to the risk of getting fired within the probationary year is:
 
The technical requirement for the PE job is a B.Sc. degree in EE.
 
How can the USPTO expect a new graduate in EE (and even those with just a year or two experience) to be able to proof-read and verify the viability of those circuit diagrams that most probably will come with the patent application, in a short time frame? I assume that a PE's job is to make sure that the EE art actually will work which will take a great deal of time (circuit diagrams), in addition to the ensurance of the claims. Let's all face it, how much can a 4-year college education really prepare you for "proving" the workability of a EE invention? Not that much.
 
Some of you probably will say "stop worry too much too early!". But for those of us still in the application pipeline, it is better know it ahead of time whether the USPTO has under-stated the job requirements, or may be I am misunderstanding that the PE job simply does not require that much technical skill (beyond those taught in the 4 years of college). Jumping into a job with the incorrect expectation can be suicidal carrer-wise.
 
Current and/or former Patent Examiners please comment on my question.
 
Thanks!

 
I don't work in hardware side so i can't speak to your questions directly (although i have friends who work in hardware). You just have to come and see what is expected in your art area, although i'm not sure it will be what you are thinking in terms of testing every circuit.
 
But i can give you the low-down on production, so you understand what is expected. You are going to have an "expectancy" measured in hours (for my art it is 31.6, for example). It is the same for everyone in your art. Then you will have a "position factor", which is dependant on your GS level (i'm a GS-12, so my position factor is 1, for a GS-11 it is .9, for a GS-9 it is .8, etc - basically lower for lower GS levels - for GS-13 i think it is 1.15 and for GS-14, primary, i think 1.25). You take the expectancy and divide it by your position factor to determine the amount of time you have to work on an application through one cycle, first action to disposal (abandon/allow/rce). That's it - if you can't do them in that time then you are gone, fired. Period.
 
Maybe they will cut you slack at the beginning, but not for long. That is what probation is about, seeing who can handle the workload.
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Prospective
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Re: Working for the USPTO
« Reply #1004 on: Jun 10th, 2007, 12:36pm »
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I would absolutely love to get employed into patent work in some fashion, but, for several reasons, living in Washington full-time is not an option for me (even if I was employed at a large law firm).  Does anyone know if the office would consider 1/2 time work at all (2 10-hr. days, for example), part time volunteer experience, or some combination of the two?
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